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Trumpet

Course Details

Course Number
AMUS 4521
Section Number
AMUS 4521
Semester
Summer I 2015
Location
Fain Fine Arts Center
Classroom Number
C117O
Days & Times

MIDWESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY

Department of Music

 

 

  1. MUSC 1521/2, 2521/2, 3521/2, 4521/2

Applied Trumpet

Instructor: Dr. Tim Justus

Fain Fine Arts C117O

940-397-6839

timothy.justus@mwsu.edu

 

  1. Course Description:

 

Applied study on trumpet. The information in this syllabus/course of study is intended to give the student the information necessary to be successful in the applied course of study on trumpet leading to the completion of the BS in Music Education of the BA in Music.  

 

Required Materials:

  1. Instrument of sufficient quality and working order to allow advanced study
  2. The student is expected to provide the necessary equipment for maintaining the instrument:
    1. Instrument lubricants, cleaning equipment, etc.
    2. Mouthpiece
    3. Music and other printed material as should become necessary
  3. Practice Log/Practice Diary (A notebook in which to date and record practice, lesson assignments, suggestions, observations, etc.)
  4. A medium sized three-ring binder
  5. Other suggested material:
  6. Metronome
  7. Auto Tuner (optional)

 

  1. Learning Outcomes:

 

      The graduate of this program will have demonstrated: the

 

  1. The ability to analyze and evaluate musical performance from various perspectives and to receive responsively, suggestions about criticism of his/her own performance from others.

 

2.    A high proficiency on a specific instrument.

 

 

 

The Student will:

 

  1. Increase trumpet performance skills including:
    1. physical skills of tone production, breath control, and finger technique
    2. aural and visual skills including sight-reading and transposition
    3. awareness, understanding and synthesis of the elements required for sensible interpretation in musical performance
  2. Familiarity with the musical and pedagogical literature associated with the trumpet
  3. Stimulation of an interest in the professional literature related to the trumpet and to brass playing
  4. Familiarity with and understanding of the basics of brass pedagogy
  5. A practical understand of the learning process aimed at increased efficiency and economy in skill acquisition on order to
  6. acquire a constructive problem solving attitude
  7. enhance the time spent in practice and study of t he trumpet
  8. Develop through listening, the awareness, appreciation and critical discernment of various styles and types of music
  9. Stimulate interest in and development of improvisational and compositional skills as they relate to trumpet performance
  10. Develop and apply appropriate strategies for dealing with performance anxiety
  11. Acquire self motivation, initiative and ability for continued study beyond the formal educational environment.

 

IV.  Course Content Outline:

 

Freshman Semester I

 

Materials:

*Trumpet Studio Scale Syllabus (Justus)

*36 Vocalises (Concone/Justus)

Complete Conservatory Method for Cornet/Trumpet (Arban)

Technical Studies for Cornet/Trumpet (Clarke)

Thirty Six Celebrated Etudes (Bousquet)

Solos from the Studio Solo List (See Appendix 2)

*(Available from instructor)

 

Semester requirements are only outlined in the syllabus. Specific methods, etudes and other material may be selected in consultation with the instructor and according to the individual’s development

 

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency in all major scales, arpeggios and major sevenths according to scale syllabus
  2. Technique patterns in Clarke
  3. 12 Etudes from Bousquet
  4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)
  5. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

  1. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)
  2. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)
  3. Faculty Jury (See music handbook)
  4. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)
  5. Transposition up one step (B flat to C trumpet)
  6. Development of a comprehensive practice routine

 

Freshman Semester II

 

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency in all minor scales, arpeggios and minor sevenths
  2. Technique patterns in Clarke
  3. 12 Etudes from Bousquet
  4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)
  5. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

  1. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)
  2. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)
  3. Faculty Jury
  4. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)
  5.  Transposition down one step (C trumpet to B Flat)
  6. Continuation of the practice routine

 

Sophomore Semester I

 

Materials:

*Trumpet Studio Scale Syllabus (Justus)

*36 Vocalises (Justus)

Complete Conservatory Method for Cornet/Trumpet (Arban)

Technical Studies for Cornet/Trumpet (Clarke)

Thirty Six Celebrated Etudes (Bousquet)

Selected Studies (Voxman) or other etude studies

Solos from the Studio Solo List

*(Available from instructor)

 

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency in all mixolydian, arpeggios, dominant sevenths according to scale syllabus
  2. Technique patterns in Clarke
  3. 12 Etudes from Bousquet
  4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)
  5. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

  1. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)
  2. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)
  3. Faculty Jury
  4. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)
  5. Transposition up a third (D trumpet)
  6. Continuation of the practice routine

 

Sophomore Semester II

 

Requirements:

  1. Proficiency in all whole tone and blues scales, and diminished sevenths
  2. Technique patterns in Clarke
  3. 12 Etudes from Voxman
  4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)
  5. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

  1. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)
  2. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)
  3. Faculty Jury for Upper Level Study
  4. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)
  5. Transposition down a half step (A trumpet)
  6. Continuation of the practice routine

Junior Semester I

 

Materials:

36 Vocalises (Justus)

Complete Conservatory Method for Cornet/Trumpet (Arban)

Technical Studies for Cornet/Trumpet (Clarke)

36 Orchestral Etudes and Last Studies (Brandt)

50 Standard Orchestral Excerpts (Justus)

Solos from the Studio Solos List

 

Requirements:

  1. Technique patterns in Clarke, etc.

3.  Etudes from Voxman

4. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)

5. Significant progress in tone production, technique, development,  

    articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special  problems

6. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)

7. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)

8. Faculty Jury

9. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)

10. Transposition up a fourth (E flat trumpet)

11. Continuation of the practice routine

12. Preparation of Junior Recital

13. Preparation of Standard Orchestral Excerpts

 

Junior Semester II

 

Requirements:

1. Technique patterns in Clarke

2. 12 Etudes from Brandt

3. 12 Etudes from Vocalises

4. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

5. Recital Class Performance (Although the MUA 100 is no longer a

    required class, performance majors will perform at least once a

    semester.)

6. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)

7. Faculty Jury for Upper Level Study

8. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)

9. Transposition up a fifth (F trumpet)

10. Continuation of the practice routine

11. Performance of Junior Recital

12. Preparation of Standard Orchestral Excerpts

 

Senior Semester I

 

Materials:

*36 Vocalises (Justus)

Complete Conservatory Method for Cornet/Trumpet (Arban)

Technical Studies for Cornet/Trumpet (Clarke)

36 Transcendental Etudes (Charlier)

Solos from the Studio Solos List

 

Requirements:

  1. Technique patterns in Clarke, et. al.

2. 12 Etudes from Charlier

3. 12 Etudes from Vocalises (Justus)

4. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

5. Development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special

    problems

6. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)

7. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)

8. Faculty Jury

9. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)

10. Transposition up an augmented fourth, B flat (E trumpet) and C (third)

11. Continuation of the practice routine

12. Preparation of Senior Recital

13. Preparation of Standard Orchestral Excerpts

 

Senior Semester II

 

Requirements:

1. Technique patterns in Clarke, et. al.

2. 12 Etudes from Charlier

3. 12 Etudes from Vocalises

4. Significant progress in consistency of tone production, technique

development, articulation, tonguing, transposition or other special problems

5. Recital Class Performance (scheduled with instructor)

6. Studio Final Exam (Last scheduled lesson)

7. Faculty Jury for Upper Level Study

8. Pass Off Requirements (Weekly)

9 Transposition up a fifth (F trumpet) C trumpet (fourth)

10. Continuation of the practice routine

11. Performance of Senior Recital

12. Preparation of Standard Orchestral Excerpts

 

V.   Teaching Strategies:

 

The following course activities may be included in the course of study:

 

  1. Practical techniques for maintaining the instruments
  2. Practice techniques and literature preparation
  3. Pattern recognition and assimilation, including finger coordination, breathing, articulation, memorization, etc.
  4. Etude analysis
  5. Listening to selected recordings
  6. Selected Reading
  7. Guided historical and pedagogical research (See Appendix 1)
  8. Public performance
  9. Attendance of live performances
  10. Building resume/repertoire

 

 

VI.  Assessment:

 

Procedures for assessing performance (Grading):

The studio grade will be determined from performance in three areas, weekly studio, studio final exam, and faculty jury.

 

Weekly Studio:

Each lesson will be graded with the exception of the first lesson, which will be an assessment lesson and a discussion of your long and short term goals. Lesson grades will be averaged and will constitute one third (1/3) of the total grade.

 

Studio Final Exam:

There will be a studio final exam each semester which will constitute one third (1/3) of the final grade. The studio exam will consist of the following:

 

  1. Scales/Technique: successful performance of all scales, arpeggios, technical exercises, etc., studied during the semester, and pass off material.
  2. Etudes: One etude of the student’s choice (prepared) and one etude of the instructor’s choice, selected from the etudes studied during the semester.
  3. Sight reading: sight reading will be required

 

Jury:

 

The final faculty jury will consist of one third (1/3) of the final grade.

(The instructor is the final authority in all matters of studio and applied grade.)

 

Grading Scale:

 

91-100         A

81-90           B

71-80           C

61-70           D

 

Grade Expectations:

 

To receive a grade of A: (excellent)

Arrive on time with lesson assignment thoroughly prepared and virtually flawless, perform ahead of chronological years, significantly reduced or solved errors or problems from previous lessons, demonstrate a sincere desire and enthusiasm to study through questions, actions and attitudes which exceed expectations.

"Be ye therefore perfect,"… (Matthew 5:48).

 

To receive a grade of B: (above average)

Arrive on time with lesson assignments well prepared, perform at or near chronological years, evidence of attention to problems from previous lessons, demonstrate an attitude of passive cooperation and willingness to meet expectations.

 

To receive a grade of C: (average)

Arrive occasionally late with lesson assignments partially prepared, (containing flaws) perform somewhat at or below the chronological years, evidence of some attention to problems from previous lessons, demonstrates an attitude of passive cooperation

 

To receive a grade of D: (below average)

Arrive frequently late with lesson assignment largely unprepared, perform behind chronological years, little evidence of attention to problems from previous lessons, demonstrate frequent lapses of concentration or attention, uncooperative attitude toward instruction.

 

Student Honor Creed:

 

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception. Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters. We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student. We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed. Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

 

Attendance:

Attendance is the one of the most important aspects of learning the material. Understanding the concepts requires practice and participation in all class activities. Irregular attendance will result in loss of work, missed tests, missed quizzes, etc. Attendance will count 10% of the total grade. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of every class.

 

Absences have consequences.

  • Individuals missing 10% of class may be denied the option for makeup exams or homework, even for missing a test with an excuse.
  • In borderline grade cases, attendance will be considered a factor, for or against.

 

Excused absences include:

  • Attendance at authorized off-campus activities or functions.
  • Confinement to a university or other health facility when a written excuse is provided.
  • Absences incurred due to illness, documented by a doctor’s excuse. Exams and class-work missed during a period of excused absence must be made up the week following the absence.

 

Special Needs:

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

Privacy Statement:

Federal privacy law prohibits the instructor from releasing information about students to certain parties outside of the university without the signed consent of the student. Thus, in almost all cases the professor will not discuss students’ academic progress or other matters with their parents. Please do not have them call. Regardless of these important legal considerations, the professors’ general policy is to communicate with the students, not their parents, even when a student has signed a consent form. College students are adults and are expected to behave accordingly.

 

Academic Dishonesty:

Academic dishonesty including plagiarism and giving or receiving unauthorized assistance is prohibited. Please review the University Honor Code. Any offense is reported to the MSU and the MSU Department of Education.

VI. Upper Level Study:

At the end of the second year of study, the student will be required to demonstrate technical mastery of the instrument in the faculty jury. In addition to the jury solo are included all major and minor scales, arpeggios, and sevenths, dominant and diminished seventh arpeggios,(memorized) a section of a technical etude and sight reading.

 

Other Miscellaneous Information

  1. Bring everything that you will play anywhere, as a solo, to your lesson for me to hear. This includes prominent solo passages in ensemble music (Wind Ensemble, Orchestra, Concert Band etc.), church performances, musicals, solos, etc. Your performance everywhere reflects on you, the university and your teacher.
  2. Inform me well in advance of any auditions or performances outside the MSU Department of Music, or of applied study with another teacher. (Applied study with another teacher is encouraged; I just want to know about it.)
  3. Take responsibility for your life. Keep a calendar with you at all times to avoid scheduling conflicts or missed events.
  4. Present yourself appropriately and observe proper decorum in all musical and academic settings. (For example, it is not appropriate to wear a hat or cross your legs in rehearsals or lessons, nor is it permitted to carry food or drink into rehearsals, classrooms, or concert halls.) Show respect for yourself and for others by observing these simple courtesies.
  5. Be early and well-prepared for all rehearsals and lessons.

 

Suggestions for Successful Progress

  1. Always be positive and enthusiastic about your love for music and the trumpet, and demonstrate this in your playing and your cooperation with other musicians.
  2. Maintain a regular, daily practice schedule of at least two hours each day.
  3. Develop with your teacher, a warm-up & practice routine covering all aspects of playing (40-60 minutes) and work on it each day.
  4. Plan practice sessions so that they are goal oriented, purposeful and directed at accomplishing specific results. Write your goals for each session in a notebook. Establish both short-term and long-term goals for yourself. Record when you achieve these goals.
  5. Always be well prepared! Be early to lessons with all your materials ready, and with plans about what you will do in the lesson. Have your questions written out so that you ask them at the beginning of the lesson.
  6. Understand that developing performance skills may at times be a slow and demanding process. Patience and persistence are important traits for success in music.
  7. Take advantage of opportunities to attend live musical performances of all kinds. More than any other event, the live performance encourages us to persevere, practice and succeed. The live performance helps us to understand that “we can do this.” Attend lectures, master-classes, professional seminars, and summer professional programs.
  8. Seek opportunities to perform in public. After learning a work, perform it several times and keep it in your repertoire, eventually memorizing it.
  9. Collect and study recordings of solo works, chamber music, orchestral music, and jazz that include your instrument.
  10. Own the necessary "tools of the trade." These include a quality instrument(s),

mutes, metronome, tuner, and music (including methods, etudes, solos, and orchestral excerpts).

11. Record your practice sessions periodically, and evaluate them objectively.

12. More practice.

13. Be resourceful! Look for orchestral and solo scores in the library.

14. Get a head start on performance anxiety by playing in front of your

     colleagues whenever possible. Memorize!

15. Read the professional literature. Use the library, interlibrary loan, the internet,

     and any other available resources to find that literature.

16. Realize that consistency and dependability are more to be desired than

     Virtuosity, and are more reapected in a professional setting

17. Know that “basics will get you a job.”

18. Understand and practice the axiom that “discipline will carry you when

     motivation fails.”

19. Understand that there is no career waiting for you. You are in the process

of preparing your career now.

     20. More practice

 

Common Pitfalls

  1. Apathy.
  2. Poor planning.
  3. Improper preparation
  4. Listening the wrong way, or to the wrong people or performances.
  5. Taking advice from the wrong people.
  6. Lack of effective practice.
  7. Being late or un-prepared.
  8. Not asking questions.
  9. Asking the wrong questions.
  10. Lack of resourcefulness or imagination.
  11. Unwillingness or inability to discipline yourself to do the right thing
  12. Laziness
  13.  Lack of Creativity
  14. Lack of attention in anticipating potential problems. We learn faster by avoiding mistakes than by making them.
  15. Lack of self discipline

 

 

 

Professor
Dr. Tim Justus (view Profile)

Course Attachments

Textbooks

Submission Format Policy Note: You may not submit a paper for a grade in this class that already has been (or will be) submitted for a grade in another course, unless you obtain the explicit written permission of me and the other instructor involved in advance.
Plagiarism Policy

Plagiarism is the use of someone else's thoughts, words, ideas, or lines of argument in your own work without appropriate documentation (a parenthetical citation at the end and a listing in "Works Cited")-whether you use that material in a quote, paraphrase, or summary. It is a theft of intellectual property and will not be tolerated, whether intentional or not.

Student Honor Creed

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception.

Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters.

We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student.

We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed.

Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

Students with Disabilities

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, (940) 397-4140.

Safe Zones Statement

The professor considers this classroom to be a place where you will be treated with respect as a human being - regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, political beliefs, age, or ability. Additionally, diversity of thought is appreciated and encouraged, provided you can agree to disagree. It is the professor's expectation that ALL students consider the classroom a safe environment.

Contacting your Instructor

All instructors in the Department have voicemail in their offices and MWSU e-mail addresses. Make sure you add your instructor's phone number and e-mail address to both email and cell phone lists of contacts.

Writing Proficiency Requirement

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed the 6 hours of Communication Core and and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at https://mwsu.edu/academics/wpr, or call 397-4131.

Campus Carry

Senate Bill 11 passed by the 84th Texas Legislature allows licensed handgun holders to carry concealed handguns on campus, effective August 1, 2016. Areas excluded from concealed carry are appropriately marked, in accordance with state law. For more information regarding campus carry, please refer to the University’s webpage at https://mwsu.edu/campus-carry/rules-policies.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact MSU Chief of Police Patrick Coggins at patrick.coggins@mwsu.edu.