It appears that your browser does not support JavaScript. We use JavaScript on our website to display some information. Please use a browser that supports JavaScript.

Elementary Spanish I

Course Details

Course Number
1134
Section Number
1134
Semester
Fall 2014
Location
Prothro-Yeager Hall
Classroom Number
203
Days & Times

Monday through Thursday 9:00 am - 9:50 am

Professor
Sarah Butler (view Profile)

Textbooks

Blitt and Casas
ISBN:
Course Objectives

COURSE CONTENT AND METHODOLOGY

 

The language teaching community agrees that learning language and culture are inextricably connected. Thus, this course focuses on developing students’ Spanish- language proficiency through modes of communication that reflect real life communication in the varied cultures of the Spanish-speaking world.  By employing interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communicative modes in Spanish, students will explore the ideas, values, beliefs and other cultural aspects of Spanish-speaking peoples across the world and how these aspects work together to affect human experience.

 

SKILLS AND OUTCOMES

 

This course involves the development of specific Spanish grammar, vocabulary and idiomatic usage in the context of the varied cultures of the Spanish-speaking world for the purpose of exploring ideas that foster aesthetic and intellectual creation in order that students may understand the human condition across cultures. By the end of the first semester, the student will be able to:

 

  • Greet, say farewell, introduce people and respond to introductions in the appropriate cultural register indicating his/her awareness of cultural norms in the Spanish-speaking world for formality, informality, personal space and gestures.
  • Engage in simple question/answer conversations using memorized and/or high-frequency expressions indicating cultural sensitivity and awareness.
  • Provide and request basic information.
  • Express ongoing actions, routine actions, future actions and past actions in the context and manner these are used in the Spanish-speaking cultures and recognize how these uses are different from those of English-speakers.
  • Describe and illustrate aspects of the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and make comparisons between these cultures and his/her own culture using basic linguistic structures and vocabulary in the target language.
  • Evaluate his/her own values, behaviors and worldviews on the socio-cultural topics presented and compare these to those of Spanish-speakers.

 

 

CORE OBJECTIVES AND ASSESSMENT

 

Core objectives for the Language, Philosophy and Culture Foundational Component Area are addressed in this course according to the following descriptions.  A global assessment tool that incorporates all required core objectives is used for assessment rather than objective specific assessment tools. This global assessment tool is called a Portafolio Cultural (Cultural Portfolio) and will be completed by students over the length of the course. Please see the attached description of the Portafolio Cultural assessment tool.

 

  • Critical Thinking:
    • Students will respond in the target language orally and in writing to questions and/or topics based upon in-class readings, presentations, and/or out-of-class assignments that require students to extract information, analyze and evaluate information and draw conclusions and/or form opinions on the topic.
    • Students will inquire, analyze, evaluate and synthesize information from various resources available in the target language on a cultural topic of his/her choosing to be presented in a variety of modes to the instructor and/or class (e.g. art work, presentations, theatrical works, essays, music)

 

  • Communication Skills:
    • Students will demonstrate ability to effectively use memorized vocabulary, high-frequency expressions, accurate grammatical usage and idiomatic expressions in the target language to effectively develop, interpret and express ideas orally and in writing with culturally appropriate sensitivity.
    • Students will demonstrate effective interpretation of memorized vocabulary, high-frequency expressions, grammatical usage and idiomatic expression in the target language both aurally and in print through the use of culturally-bound print and multi-media.

 

  • Personal Responsibility
    • Students will demonstrate the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical-decision making by writing a personal reflection essay on a specific cultural topic that presents an ethical dilemma or issue for resolution.
    • In their personal reflection essays, students will identify their core beliefs and the origins of those core beliefs, recognize complex ethical issues and relationships between issues, state a position on an ethical issue and connect their position to implied actions and consequences.[1]

 

  • Social Responsibility
    • Students will demonstrate intercultural competence and knowledge of civic responsibility as demonstrated in the connections or comparisons made by the student between his/her own culture and the target culture
    • Alternatively and/or additionally, students will demonstrate intercultural competence and knowledge of civic responsibility by engaging in four (4) volunteer hours in the local, regional, national or global Spanish-speaking community through the service projects of the Spanish Club, another campus or community organization and/or through an alternative Spring Break option.


[1] Modified from AACU Ethical Responsibility VALUE Rubric.



 

Course Expectations

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

Participation & Attendance

Ten percent of the course grade will be based on a combination of attendance and participation. 

Six percent (6%) will be based on the student’s use of Spanish, active participation and volunteering in classroom activities.  Participation points will be awarded by the instructor in the form of papelitos (or little pieces of paper). At the end of the semester you should have 100 papelitos for a 100% in participation.  Papelitos are awarded for your active participation in classroom activities in the target language (Spanish) and your volunteering to answer the instructor’s questions (in Spanish).

 

The remaining four percent (4%) is based on your attendance. The instructor will take attendance every day. Students are required to be in class for the entire 50 minute period.  Students may be counted absent if arriving more than 10 minutes late or leaving class early. The attendance grade is calculated by dividing the number of days that you are in class by the numbers of days that the class meets. (Example for 2 absences out of a total of 57 class days: 55/57 = .9649 = 96.49%)

 

Absences due to official university functions or documented illness will be dealt with on an individual basis and should be discussed with the instructor outside of class time. There are no “excused absences” from regular class periods. Each absence lowers your attendance grade.

 

If a student will miss an exam due to an official university function, the student should make arrangements with the instructor prior to his/her absence. If a student misses an exam, he/she must present documented proof of illness or university activity to the instructor before a make-up exam will be allowed.

 

This syllabus serves as notice that a student may be dropped from the class without further notification if absent more than six times. Please note that if a student decides to drop the course, he/she must follow university procedure for dropping a course in order to receive a “W.”  University policy dictates that if an instructor instigates a drop, the student will receive a “WF” or “F,” depending on the date of the drop.

 

Homework, quizzes and other assignments

Regular study, reading and homework assignments will be made from the text and/or other sources. Students are expected to prepare homework as assigned. Frequent quizzes, based on homework and class work, will be given. Graded quizzes and homework assignments will account for 20% of the course grade. No late work is accepted and no make-up quizzes are offered. Two grades from this category will be dropped at the end of the semester.

 

Language Lab (Moffett 112A). You will take a listening comprehension quiz in the Foreign Language Laboratory in Moffett 112A once for each chapter covered this semester. There are a total of six lab quizzes to complete. Please give your MSU Student ID to the lab attendant in order to receive your quiz. You will receive a cassette tape, a quiz and a Scantron. You may use your textbook while you complete the quiz, but do not use any other materials. Also, please do not write on the quiz. Please sign out at the lab attendant’s desk in order to retrieve your student id. Make-up and/or late quizzes are NOT permitted. One lab grade will be dropped at the end of the semester. Language Lab quizzes make up 10% of the course grade. Please note the due dates and schedule of lab hours given below.

 

Chapter 1: Sept. 17

Chapter 2:  Oct. 1

Chapter 3:  Oct. 15

Chapter 4: Oct. 29

Chapter 5:  Nov. 19

Chapter 6:  Dec. 3

 

 

Language Lab hours (Moffett 112A)

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

8:00 – 9:30 am

11:30 am – 3:00 pm

8:00 – 9:30 am

1:00 – 6:30 pm

8:00 am – 2:30 pm

1:00 – 6:30 pm

8:00 – 9:30 am

1:00 – 4:30 pm

10:00 am – 1:30 pm

2:00 – 4:30 pm

 

 

Exploraciones Student Activities Manual and CourseMate/iLRN (optional workbook and online audio exercises)

                The Student Activities Manual (SAM) contains activities to help students master the vocabulary and grammatical concepts presented and practiced in class. Audio exercises are indicated by a speaker icon. Students may listen to the audio files on their own devices or on any campus computer connected to the internet and equipped with headphones. In order to facilitate pronunciation practice, students may want to use a device equipped with a microphone. Working on a regular basis with this resource will help students achieve improved Spanish proficiency.

 

Portafolio Cultural

The Portafolio Cultural serves as an assessment of your performance of the core curriculum objectives of Critical Thinking Skills, Communication Skills, Social and Personal Responsibility in the specific context of this course. It will consist of three 1 – 2 page essays on cultural topics and a 1 – 2 page personal reflection essay. It will count 10% of your final course grade. Please see the document Portafolio Cultural for complete details.

Grading Standards

Grading components         

 

Participation and Attendance

10%

Quizzes and Homework

20%

Language Laboratory Quizzes

10%

Exams (3 major exams) and Portafolio Cultural (10% each)

40%

Comprehensive Final Exam

20%

 

Final Exam 12/06/2014 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Submission Format Policy

Description:

The Portafolio Cultural serves as an assessment of student’s performance of the core curriculum objectives of Critical Thinking Skills, Communication Skills, Social and Personal Responsibility in the specific context of this course. Students will develop the portfolio based upon topics from the Conexiones Culturales spreads in the Exploraciones text from Chapters 1 through 6 and corresponding sub-sections (Conexiones, Cultura, Comparaciones and Comunidad). Each topic must be from a different chapter and a total of three topics must be researched and corresponding work submitted as components of the portfolio. The activities in the Conexiones Culturales sub-sections are meant to be a starting point for further investigation, analysis, and synthesis by the student. Students are also encouraged to refer to the chapter sections titled En Vivo, Redacción, Lectura and Exploraciones Profesionales as additional sources of ideas for topics for their portfolios. Students should choose topics that interest them and demonstrate that they have adequately researched and considered the topics in the framework of the core curriculum objectives.

 

In addition to the above textbook-based topics, students may report on a personal intercultural experience gained through a minimum of four (4) hours of volunteer service in the local, regional, national or global Spanish-speaking community through the service projects of the Spanish Club, another campus or community organization and/or through an alternative Spring Break option. This option can replace one of the assignments based upon the Conexiones Culturales topics. However, the assignment must meet the same submission requirements as the textbook-based topics. Students must also request the instructor’s permission prior to submitting this type of assignment.

 

The Portafolio Cultural will also include a personal reflection essay on one of the three cultural topics already researched for the Portafolio or on a specific cultural topic presented by the instructor. The cultural topic chosen by the student or presented by the instructor will present students with an ethical dilemma or issues for resolution. In the essay, students will identify their core beliefs and the origins of those core beliefs, recognize the ethical issues presented and relationships between issues, state a position on an ethical issue and connect their position to implied actions and consequences.[1]

 

Format and submission of work:

Various formats of work will be accepted as components of the portfolio. However, if students would like to submit work in a format other than the one described below, they should first obtain the instructor’s permission. Students must keep in mind that the portfolio is an assessment of their demonstration of the core objectives listed above. Thus, the portfolio must show evidence of development of these objectives. Any visual, auditory, or technology-based submissions such as art work, theatrical or musical works, must be accompanied by at least a half page explanation of how the submission fulfills the activity chosen from the Conexiones Culturales spread. For example, if a student were to submit a sketch of a favorite building in town for the Conexiones…a la arquitectura sub-section on p. 133, the student would also need to also submit at least a half page description of how his/her work answers or fulfills the purpose of the corresponding Conexiones Culturales activity.

 

Portfolio submissions may be completed primarily in English but each submission should contain a summary paragraph of a minimum of four (4) sentences in Spanish that demonstrates the Spanish grammar, vocabulary and idiomatic usage learned over the course of the semester.

 

The complete portfolio must be submitted by Monday, December 1, 2014, and should be submitted in print form (see above). No late submissions will be accepted.

 

Criteria for Assessment of Portafolio Cultural

(Please note that the rubric for scoring the Portafolio is available on D2L. The list below is a general description of required content and objectives for assessment).

 

 Content: The Portafolio

  • Includes three assignments based on sub-sections Cultura, Conexiones, Comparaciones or Comunidades, and/or a personal intercultural experience as mentioned above
  •  Includes a personal reflection essay of at least one page (25-28 lines, font 10-12) on a specific cultural topic that includes an ethical dilemma or addresses ethical perspectives related to culture.
  • meets the minimum requirement of at least one page per topic (25-28 lines, font 10-12) or the minimum requirement of at least ½ page per topic (12-14 lines, font 10-12) if the student is submitting work in an alternate format.

 

Critical thinking: The Portafolio demonstrates inquiry, analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information from various resources available in Spanish and English on the topics of the student’s choosing.

 

Communication: The Portafolio demonstrates effective use of memorized vocabulary, high-frequency expressions, accurate grammatical usage and idiomatic expressions in the target language to develop, interpret and express ideas with culturally appropriate sensitivity. Furthermore, the Portafolio demonstrates accurate interpretation of target language print and multi-media resources.

 

Personal Responsibility: The Portafolio demonstrates the student’s ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical-decision making. In the form of a personal reflection essay that addresses a culturally-bound ethical dilemma, the student identifies his/her core beliefs and the origin of those beliefs, recognizes complex ethical issues and relationships between issues, states a position on an ethical issue and connects his/her position to implied actions and consequences.

 

Social responsibility: The Portafolio shows evidence of the student’s intercultural competence and knowledge of civic responsibility as demonstrated in the connections or comparisons made by the student between his/her own culture and the target culture.

 



[1] Modified from AACU Ethical Responsibility VALUE Rubric.

 


Note: You may not submit a paper for a grade in this class that already has been (or will be) submitted for a grade in another course, unless you obtain the explicit written permission of me and the other instructor involved in advance.
Late Paper Policy

No late work accepted. No make-up quizzes given.

Plagiarism Policy

Plagiarism is the use of someone else's thoughts, words, ideas, or lines of argument in your own work without appropriate documentation (a parenthetical citation at the end and a listing in "Works Cited")-whether you use that material in a quote, paraphrase, or summary. It is a theft of intellectual property and will not be tolerated, whether intentional or not.

Student Honor Creed

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception.

Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters.

We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student.

We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed.

Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

Students with Disabilities

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, (940) 397-4140.

Safe Zones Statement

The professor considers this classroom to be a place where you will be treated with respect as a human being - regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, political beliefs, age, or ability. Additionally, diversity of thought is appreciated and encouraged, provided you can agree to disagree. It is the professor's expectation that ALL students consider the classroom a safe environment.

Contacting your Instructor

All instructors in the Department have voicemail in their offices and MWSU e-mail addresses. Make sure you add your instructor's phone number and e-mail address to both email and cell phone lists of contacts.

Attendance Requirements

Participation & Attendance

Ten percent of the course grade will be based on a combination of attendance and participation. 

Six percent (6%) will be based on the student’s use of Spanish, active participation and volunteering in classroom activities.  Participation points will be awarded by the instructor in the form of papelitos (or little pieces of paper). At the end of the semester you should have 100 papelitos for a 100% in participation.  Papelitos are awarded for your active participation in classroom activities in the target language (Spanish) and your volunteering to answer the instructor’s questions (in Spanish).

 

The remaining four percent (4%) is based on your attendance. The instructor will take attendance every day. Students are required to be in class for the entire 50 minute period.  Students may be counted absent if arriving more than 10 minutes late or leaving class early. The attendance grade is calculated by dividing the number of days that you are in class by the numbers of days that the class meets. (Example for 2 absences out of a total of 57 class days: 55/57 = .9649 = 96.49%)

 

Absences due to official university functions or documented illness will be dealt with on an individual basis and should be discussed with the instructor outside of class time. There are no “excused absences” from regular class periods. Each absence lowers your attendance grade.

 

If a student will miss an exam due to an official university function, the student should make arrangements with the instructor prior to his/her absence. If a student misses an exam, he/she must present documented proof of illness or university activity to the instructor before a make-up exam will be allowed.

 

This syllabus serves as notice that a student may be dropped from the class without further notification if absent more than six times. Please note that if a student decides to drop the course, he/she must follow university procedure for dropping a course in order to receive a “W.”  University policy dictates that if an instructor instigates a drop, the student will receive a “WF” or “F,” depending on the date of the drop.

 

Other Policies

COURSE CALENDAR

August

 

Week 1 

Chapter 1

  • Greetings and the Alphabet; Pronunciation

 

 

  • Classroom vocabulary; Gender and Numbers of Nouns
  • Numbers 0-20

 

 

  • Definite and indefinite articles; Use of hay
  •  Latinos and Hispanos: Geographic distribution of Spanish-speaking peoples; Linguistic diversity

 

 

 

September

 

 

Labor Day Holiday

 

No classes

Week 2

 

  • Numbers through 101
  • Reading (using cognates): La escuela es para todos
  • Adjectives

 

 

  • Noun and Adjective Agreement
  • Diversity in the Spanish-speaking world

 

 

 

Week 3

 

  • Subject Pronouns and the verb ser
  • Bilingualism and Careers: Office Assistant

 

Chapter 2

  • Academic subjects;  the verb tener
  • Education in the Spanish-speaking world

 

 

  • Adjective placement
  •  Reading (predicting): Otros sistemas universitarios

 

 

 

Week 4

 

  • The family; Regular –ar verbs;
  • The role and value of the family in the Spanish-speaking world

 

 

  • More regular ar verbs

 

 

  • Possessive adjectives
  • Reading (predicting): La familia típica latinoamericana
  • Bilingualism and Careers: Education

 

 

 

Week 5

 

  • Review of Chapters 1 and 2
  • Exploring Literature: Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer and Gloria Fuertes

Thursday, Sept. 25

EXAM I

Chapters 1 and 2

 

Chapter 3

  • Days of the Week; Months; Telling time
  •  the verb gustar

 

 

 

Week 6

 

  • Regular –er and –ir verbs
  •  Celebrations in the Spanish-speaking world

 

 

October

 

 

Week 6 continued

 

  • Reading (skimming): La Navidad en algunos países hispanos
  • Weather, clothing, colors

 

 

  • Interrogative words
  •  Climate and Clothing in the Spanish-speaking world

 

Week 7

 

  • Review regular –ar, -er, -ir verbs
  •  Stem-changing verbs

 

 

  • Reading: Los trajes tradicionales

 

 

  • Comprehensive practice with verbs and interrogatives
  • Bilingualism and Careers: Tourism

 

Week 8

Chapter 4

  • Places in the city; the verb estar with prepositions of place

 

 

  • Extraordinary cities in the Spanish-speaking world (Pre-Hispanic and Modern)
  •  the verb ir and ir with infinitives

 

 

Friday, October 17

Topics list due for Portafolio Cultural

  • Unique houses in the Spanish-speaking world (Famous Hispanic architects)
  •  Reading (re-reading): Algunas ciudades únicas de Latinoamérica

 

 

 

Week 9

 

  • House vocabulary, rooms and appliances
  • More stem-changing verbs

 

 

  • Adjective placement
  • Reading (review strategies): Soluciones para la vivienda en Cuba
  • Bilingualism and Careers: Architecture

 

 

  • Review of Chapters 3 and 4
  •  Exploring Literature: Claribel Alegría

 

 

 

Week 10  Mon., Oct. 27*

EXAM II

Chapters 3 and 4

 

Chapter 5

  • Feelings and conditions with the verb estar
  • The verb estar with adjectives and the present progressive

 

*Last day to drop with “W”

  • Emotions expressed through works of famous Hispanic artists: Francisco de Goya and Frida Kahlo

November

 

 

Week 11

 

  • Comparison of the verbs ser and estar
  •  Reading (guessing verb tenses): ¿Quiénes son más felices?

 

 

  • Professions and employment
  •  Verbs with irregular 1st person forms

 

 

  • Professions/Economy in the Spanish-speaking world
  • more verbs w/ irreg 1st person forms (saber and conocer)

 

 

 

Week 12

 

  • Comprehensive Practice with Verbs
  •  ser vs. estar, saber vs. conocer
  •  Bilingualism and Careers: Social work

 

Chapter 6

  • Parts of the body; Daily routines; reflexive verbs

 

 

  • More reflexive verbs
  •  Daily Life in the Spanish-speaking world

 

 

 

Week 13

 

  • Indefinite and Negative words
  •  Reading (making notes): La siesta

 

 

  • Past-times, sports and vacations
  •  The preterite tense

 

 

 

Chapter 7

  • Sports in Spain and Latin America
  • Stem-changing verbs in the preterit
  • Verbs with irregular preterit forms

 


Week 14

 

  • Review of Chapters 5, 6 and 7 (irregular preterit only)
  • Bilingualism and Careers: Physical education
  • Exploring Literature: Donato Ndongo

26 Thanksgiving Holiday

28 Thanksgiving Holiday

No classes

No classes

 

 

 

December

 

 Week 15  Mon., Dec. 1

                   Tues., Dec. 2

Portafolio Cultural DUE

EXAM III          Chapters 5, 6, and 7 (irregular preterit only)

 

  • Review for Comprehensive Final Exam

 

 

                       

 

Final Exam: Saturday, December 6, 10:30 am – 12:30 pm

  

 

 

Students with Disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act, (ADA), is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, 397-4140.

 

 

Safe Zones Statement. The professor considers this classroom to be a place where you will be treated with respect as a human being - regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, political beliefs, age, or ability. Additionally, diversity of thought is appreciated and encouraged, provided you can agree to disagree. It is the professor's expectation that ALL students consider the classroom a safe environment.

Writing Proficiency Requirement

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed the 6 hours of Communication Core and and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at https://mwsu.edu/academics/wpr, or call 397-4131.

Campus Carry

Senate Bill 11 passed by the 84th Texas Legislature allows licensed handgun holders to carry concealed handguns on campus, effective August 1, 2016. Areas excluded from concealed carry are appropriately marked, in accordance with state law. For more information regarding campus carry, please refer to the University’s webpage at https://mwsu.edu/campus-carry/rules-policies.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact MSU Chief of Police Patrick Coggins at patrick.coggins@mwsu.edu.