It appears that your browser does not support JavaScript. We use JavaScript on our website to display some information. Please use a browser that supports JavaScript.

Intermediate Composition and Grammar

Course Details

Course Number
2113
Section Number
2113
Semester
Summer I 2017
Location
Prothro-Yeager Hall
Classroom Number
205
Days & Times

ENGL 2113-301 MTWR 10:10 AM-12:10 PM

ENGL 2113-301 MTWR 12:20-2:20 PM

Professor
Dr. Peter Fields (view Profile)

Textbooks

The Best American Essays of the Century
Ed. Joyce Carol Oates & Robert Atwan
ISBN:
LB Brief
6th edition (or previous)
ISBN:
Course Objectives

 

INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION & GRAMMAR / SUMMER ONE 2017

ENGL 2113-301 10:10 AM – 12:10 PM MTWR PY 205

ENGL 2113-302 12:20-2:20 PM MTWR PY 205

  • LB Brief. 6th ed. Jane E. Aaron. (Or any edition of LB Brief, used or new)
  • The Best American Essays of the Century. Ed. Joyce Carol Oates and Robert Atwan. Boston and New York:  Houghton Mifflin, 2000.
  • Write thesis-based essays that provide strong support and specific details.
  • Engage in a writing process that includes invention, drafting, and revision.
  • Demonstrate critical and creative thinking about a timely issue or debatable topic.
  • Demonstrate proficient use of Standard Written English.

 

Course Expectations

MLA format for in-body citing. NOTE: Don’t start with a quote and then comment on it afterwards. Provide attribution—In/According to/As we see in author & title of essay—and then provide the situation and key idea in YOUR words PRIOR to the direct quote. Use our required essay in ONE of your two body paragraphs and quote from that essay:

Don’t start a body paragraph with your use of the required essay. Start a body paragraph with a topic sentence based on a supporting point in your introductory paragraph. Make sure you made the point before you bring in the required essay. Note that you also need an example from your own experience.

Segregation turns the other race into a mystery. Our lack of knowledge will then make us both fearful and suspicious of the other race, and the tension will tend to reinforce the separation. In my own high school experience in a little dairy farming town in north Texas, all the jocks in the cafeteria seemed to clump together at lunchtime and sit with each other according to their sport and their race, and no one was making them do it. I noticed sometimes that a clique of white athletes—especially from the football team—might laugh really loud. The joke might have had nothing to do with race. But all the black athletes at my table would stop and listen. The situation could happen in reverse as well. The black athletes at a table might laugh really loud, and the white kids would suddenly stop talking and glance their way. In Maya Angelou’s essay, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” she tells the story of coming of age working for her grandmother in rural Arkansas. Maya’s name here is Marguerite Johnson, and her grandmother’s world was strikingly segregated. Her grandmother’s store mostly catered to black customers, and sometimes Marguerite could almost forget the white world existed: “In Stamps the segregation was so complete that most black children didn’t really, absolutely know what whites looked like” (353). Marguerite thought of white people as a whole different species from another planet: “These others, the strange pale creatures that lived in their alien unlife, weren’t considered folks. They were whitefolks” (353). I was always jealous of Jeff Smith. He was black, the star of the basketball team, and, man, he was cool. His secret was how easy-going he was. It didn’t hurt he was so tall and seemed to look down at everybody. He would smile from on high, work a tooth-pick between his teeth, and laugh in this slow, easygoing way that made people want to be around him, black and white. People like Jeff were crucial. If he stopped by a white table, black kids felt all right joining in. If he was lingering by the black table, the white kids felt they could come over and say something.

If your quote is exceptionally long, then set it off an extra inch on the left instead of using quotation marks around it (i.e., what we call a block quote):

Segregation turns the other race into a mystery. Our lack of knowledge will then make us both fearful and suspicious of the other race, and the tension will tend to reinforce the separation. In my own high school experience in a little dairy farming town in north Texas, all the jocks in the cafeteria seemed to clump together at lunchtime and sit with each other according to their sport and their race, and no one was making them do it. I noticed sometimes that a clique of white athletes—especially from the football team—might laugh really loud. The joke might have had nothing to do with race. But all the black athletes at my table would stop and listen. The situation could happen in reverse as well. The black athletes at a table might laugh really loud, and the white kids would suddenly stop talking and glance their way. As we see in Maya Angelou’s essay, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” the author’s young alter ego, Marguerite, came of age living in an almost completely segregated world. Her grandmother’s store mostly catered to black customers, and sometimes Marguerite could almost forget the white world existed. White people were like an “alien” race of “strange pale creatures” (353) from another planet. White people were to be feared, of course, because (based on what she heard from everyone) whites presided as the beautiful (not the plain), the employers (not the employee), the wealthy (not the struggling), and the authority in all things (not the weak). Their near-mythical status made them seem remote to Marguerite:

In Stamps the segregation was so complete that most black children didn’t really, absolutely know what whites looked like. Other than that they were different, to be dreaded, and in that dread was included the hostility of the powerless against the powerful, the poor against the rich, the worker against the worked-for, and the ragged against the well-dressed. I remember never believing that whites were really real. (353)

I was always jealous of Jeff Smith. He was black, the star of the basketball team, and, man, he was cool. His secret was how easy-going he was. It didn’t hurt he was tall and seemed to look down at everybody. He would smile from on high, work a tooth-pick between his teeth, and laugh in this slow, easygoing way that made people want to be around him, black and white. People like Jeff were crucial. If he was at a white table, black kids came over. If he was by the black, the white kids—whether they were jocks or not—would feel all right stopping by and listening to what was going on.

MLA format for Works Cited (put at the end of the Blue Book).

Angelo, Maya. “I Know Why the Cage Bird Sings.” The Best American Essays of the Century. Ed. Joyce Carol Oates and Robert Atwan. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. 342-57.

Grading Standards

 

Assignment                                                           % of Grade

10 exercises on D2L                                                            10                                      

5 writing assignments:                                                 

W1   5 %; W2 10 %; W3 12%; W4 13%  W5 10%      total: 50

Final Grammar Test                                                             20                                 

Final Blue Book Essay                                                         20

Grammar Final: Thursday, July 6, 2017, in Bea Wood 117 Computer Classroom; Blue Book Final (in our classroom): Friday, July 7, 2017.

Your grades in this class are based on this scale: A = 100-90%; B = 89-80%; C = 79-70%; D = 69-60%; F = 59-0%.  

 

Final Exam 07/07/2017 FINAL Blue Book Sec 301: 10:10 AM; Sec 302 12:20 PM
Submission Format Policy

NOTE FOR ENGL 2113: Blue Books are based on prompts provided by the instructor based on selections from The Best American Essays of the Century with special emphasis on the student’s own thoughts, knowledge, and personal experience. In one of their body paragraphs, students must bring in something from the required essay and quote from it at least once.


Note: You may not submit a paper for a grade in this class that already has been (or will be) submitted for a grade in another course, unless you obtain the explicit written permission of me and the other instructor involved in advance.
Late Paper Policy

During Summer One, 2017, a missed Blue Book SUBMISSION DATE may be made up penalty-free later in the day (no questions asked). But the student must alert the instructor, and the opportunity is over as of 5:00 PM.

If the entire due date is missed, then the student must take the initiative to contact the instructor to arrange a make-up session. Without documentation the instructor deems valid, the Blue Book is penalized 10 points out of 100. 

QUIZZES: D2L grammar exercises are worth one point each for a total of 10 points (10 percent) of the total semester grade irrespective of the student score. Students may use their own computers or those in the computer lab in Clark Student Center. 

IMPORTANT: If you know ahead of time that you are going to miss certain days (and certain Blue Books) for whatever reason, make sure to meet with the instructor RIGHT AWAY and make a plan to take care of the scheduled Blue Book/Exam BEFORE YOU DISAPPEAR. If you adhere to the plan, you are NOT penalized.

WARNING: Even if the instructor has arranged ahead of time for make-up opportunities, those missed class periods still count under the attendance policy as absences.

Plagiarism Policy

Plagiarism is the use of someone else's thoughts, words, ideas, or lines of argument in your own work without appropriate documentation (a parenthetical citation at the end and a listing in "Works Cited")-whether you use that material in a quote, paraphrase, or summary. It is a theft of intellectual property and will not be tolerated, whether intentional or not.

Student Honor Creed

As an MSU Student, I pledge not to lie, cheat, steal, or help anyone else do so."

As students at MSU, we recognize that any great society must be composed of empowered, responsible citizens. We also recognize universities play an important role in helping mold these responsible citizens. We believe students themselves play an important part in developing responsible citizenship by maintaining a community where integrity and honorable character are the norm, not the exception.

Thus, We, the Students of Midwestern State University, resolve to uphold the honor of the University by affirming our commitment to complete academic honesty. We resolve not only to be honest but also to hold our peers accountable for complete honesty in all university matters.

We consider it dishonest to ask for, give, or receive help in examinations or quizzes, to use any unauthorized material in examinations, or to present, as one's own, work or ideas which are not entirely one's own. We recognize that any instructor has the right to expect that all student work is honest, original work. We accept and acknowledge that responsibility for lying, cheating, stealing, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty fundamentally rests within each individual student.

We expect of ourselves academic integrity, personal professionalism, and ethical character. We appreciate steps taken by University officials to protect the honor of the University against any who would disgrace the MSU student body by violating the spirit of this creed.

Written and adopted by the 2002-2003 MSU Student Senate.

Students with Disabilities

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Disability Support Services in Room 168 of the Clark Student Center, (940) 397-4140.

Safe Zones Statement

The professor considers this classroom to be a place where you will be treated with respect as a human being - regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, political beliefs, age, or ability. Additionally, diversity of thought is appreciated and encouraged, provided you can agree to disagree. It is the professor's expectation that ALL students consider the classroom a safe environment.

Contacting your Instructor

All instructors in the Department have voicemail in their offices and MWSU e-mail addresses. Make sure you add your instructor's phone number and e-mail address to both email and cell phone lists of contacts.

Attendance Requirements

 

If you have more than 6 absences (excused or not), you AUTOMATICALLY fail the class unless those additional absences (after the allowed six) are specifically accounted for in documentation the instructor deems appropriate. If students miss all their allowed absences early in the semester, the instructor is at liberty to withdraw the student with a WF.

 

Other Policies

 

If you have more than 6 absences (excused or not), you AUTOMATICALLY fail the class unless those additional absences (after the allowed six) are specifically accounted for in documentation the instructor deems appropriate. If students miss all their allowed absences early in the semester, the instructor is at liberty to withdraw the student with a WF.

The instructor will not sign a withdrawal slip unless directed to do so by the Writing Proficiency office (i.e., as directed by the Writing Director through the Writing Proficiency Assistant). The only withdrawal the instructor can initiate is removal from class with a WF.

 E-mail contact is the most reliable (not on D2L): peter.fields@mwsu.edu. My office phone is 397-4246 (voice mail message is fine). Please let the instructor know what is going on when you miss class.

I am not able to provide instruction by e-mail. I can answer specific questions by e-mail, but not at length or in depth. I am able to review (to a limited degree) during an office appointment, but I do not guarantee an office appointment will cover all the relevant points of what a student may miss or not understand in class. The university is not open on Fridays.

 

Writing Proficiency Requirement

All students seeking a Bachelor's degree from Midwestern State University must satisfy a writing proficiency requirement once they've 1) passed the 6 hours of Communication Core and and 2) earned 60 hours. You may meet this requirement by passing either the Writing Proficiency Exam or English 2113. Please keep in mind that, once you've earned over 90 hours, you lose the opportunity to take the $25 exam and have no option but to enroll in the three-credit hour course. If you have any questions about the exam, visit the Writing Proficiency Office website at https://mwsu.edu/academics/wpr, or call 397-4131.

Calendar Attachment

ENGL 2113 301 & 302 Syllabus & Tentative Schedule Sum I 2017-20170604-182600.doc

Campus Carry

Senate Bill 11 passed by the 84th Texas Legislature allows licensed handgun holders to carry concealed handguns on campus, effective August 1, 2016. Areas excluded from concealed carry are appropriately marked, in accordance with state law. For more information regarding campus carry, please refer to the University’s webpage at https://mwsu.edu/campus-carry/rules-policies.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact MSU Chief of Police Patrick Coggins at patrick.coggins@mwsu.edu.