Institutional Report

Midwestern State University

 

Gordon T. and Ellen West College of Education

 

Institutional Report


























 

  

 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education

 

Board of Examiners Visit

Table of Contents

Overview

 

Midwestern State University

  • A Brief History
  • MSU Vision and Strategic Plan
  • Comparison of University, College, and Service Area Demographics

 

The Gordon T. and Ellen West College of Education

  • Academic Rank of Professional Education Faculty Fall 2010
  • Programs and their Review Status
  •  

 

 

Type of Visit:

 

OVERVIEW

 

A. Institution

 

A.1. A Brief History of Midwestern State University

Midwestern State Universitywas founded in 1922 as Wichita Falls Junior College, the second municipal junior college in Texas. Wichita Falls Junior College was originally housed within Wichita Falls High School and shared its faculty. Later, a legislative act and vote of the people of Wichita Falls set up a separate tax district to support the new junior college. In 1937, Wichita Falls Junior College acquired a forty-acre campus of its own in a pasture south of Wichita Falls High School. The Hardin Building was the first structure built on this land and became the new home of Wichita Falls Junior College.The Spanish Colonial architecture of the Hardin Building featured a prominent bell tower and established a style that persists to the present in all campus structures. Later that year, the college was renamed Hardin Junior College in honor of Mr. and Mrs. John G. Hardin, a local philanthropist.

 

In 1946, a senior college division was added, and the name was changed to Hardin College. In March 1948, Hardin College became a member of the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. In January 1950, the Hardin College became Midwestern University, but the junior college division remained Hardin Junior College until 1959. In January 1959, Midwestern University added a Graduate School, receiving full approval and accreditation from the State Board of Education in August of that year.

 

On September 1, 1961, the 56th Legislature of the State of Texas made Midwestern University part of the Texas Colleges and University System. In 1975, the junior college was dissolved, and the Texas Legislature changed the name to Midwestern State University.

 

Midwestern State University now includes six colleges with a student population of over 6200 and approximately 250 full time faculty members. Its campus has grown to 255 acres with 51 buildings.

 

 

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A.2. The Mission of Midwestern State University

Midwestern State University (MSU) is a leading public liberal arts university committed to providing students with rigorous undergraduate and graduate education in the liberal arts and the professions. Through an emphasis upon teaching, augmented by the opportunity for students to engage in research and creative activities alongside faculty and to participate in co-curricular and service programs, Midwestern State University prepares its graduates to embark upon their careers or pursue advanced study. The university’s undergraduate education is based upon a comprehensive arts and sciences curriculum. The understanding that students gain of themselves, others, and the social and natural world prepares them to contribute constructively to society through their work and through their private lives.

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A.3. What are the institution's characteristics [e.g., control (e.g., public or private) and type of institution such as private, land grant, or HBI; location (e.g., urban, rural, or suburban area)]?

 

Midwestern State University is a public, state supported member of the Texas Colleges and University System. It is officially recognizedby the Texas State Legislature as a liberal arts university. MSU is governed by its own ten member Board of Regentswhose regular members are appointed by the Governor of Texas and serve a six year term. MSU is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC). MSU is a member of The Texas Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (TACTE) and the Association of Teacher Educators (ATE). MSU is locatedin a primarily residential area in south-central Wichita Falls, Texas, a north Texas city with a population of approximately 110, 000.

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A.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the institutional context may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

B. The Unit

 

B.1. What is the professional education Unit at your institution and what is its relationship to other Units at the institution that are involved in the preparation of professional educators?

 

The professional education Unit at Midwestern State University is the Gordon T. and Ellen West College of Education. The West College of Education (WCoE) partners with other colleges who share in the preparation of teacher candidates by providing a sound foundation in the liberal arts and the specialized knowledge and skills necessary for their success as practicing teachers. These include the Prothro-Yeager College of Humanities and Social Sciences, The College of Science and Mathematics, The Lamar D. Fain College of Fine Arts, The College of Health and Human Services, and the Dillard College of Business Administration. The Teacher Education Committee coordinates and supervises all teacher preparation curricula, including student teaching. The Teacher Education Committee consists of the deans of all the colleges listed above, the certification officer, and the chairs of the Departments of Education and Reading, English, Spanish, Music, Art, Theatre, Science, History, and Mathematics. In addition, community and public school representatives serve on the Teacher Education Committee. The Teacher Education Committee is chaired by and reports to the Dean of the College of Education.

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B.2. How many professional education faculty members support the professional education Unit? Please complete Table 1 or upload your own table at Prompt B.7 below.

 

Table 1

Professional Education Faculty

 

Professional

Education

Faculty

 

 

Full-time in

the Unit

Full-time in the

Institution, but Part-time in the Unit

Part-time at the

Institution & the Unit (e.g., adjunct faculty)

Graduate Teaching

Assistants Teaching or Supervising Clinical Practice

Total # of

Professional

Education Faculty

Number of faculty

26

0

10

0

36

 

B.3. What programs are offered at your institution to prepare candidates for their first license to teach? Please complete Table 2 or upload your own table at Prompt B.7 below. 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2

Initial Teacher Preparation Programs and Their Review Status

B.4. What programs are offered at your institution to prepare advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals? Please complete Table 3 or upload your own table at Prompt B.7 below. 

 

 

 

Table 3

Advanced Preparation Programs and Their Review Status

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Program

 

 

 

Award Level

(e.g.,Bachelor's

or Master's)

 

 

 

Number of

Candidates

Enrolled or

Admitted

Agency or

Association

Reviewing

Programs (e.g.,

State, NAEYC,

or Bd. of

Regents)

Program Report

Submitted for

National Review

(Yes/No)

 

 

State Approval

Status (e.g.,

approved or

provisional)

 

Status of

National

Recognition of

Programs by

NCATE

Principal

Master’s

62

ELCC

Yes

Approved

Under review

Superintendent

Certification

10

ELCC

Yes

Approved

Under review

School Counseling

Master’s

12

State

No

Approved

NA

Reading Specialist

Master’s

7

IRA

Yes

Approved

Under review

Educational Diagnostician

Master’s

13

CEC

Yes

Approved

Under review

Dyslexia Specialist

Master’s

40

State

Yes

Approved

NA

Curriculum and Instruction

Master’s

 

 

Yes

Approved

 

 

B.5. Which of the above initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation programs are offered off-campus or via distance learning technologies? What alternate route programs are offered? [In addition to this response, please review the "Institutional Information" in AIMS and, if updating is needed, contact NCATE with details about these programs.]

 

The unit does not offer initial or advanced preparation programs off-campus or through distance learning technologies.

 

Some courses for initial or advanced programs are taught using online learning software or through interactive television. However, these are not viewed by the unit as off-campus or distance learning programs. The courses are still part of a regular on-campus program.

 

Post-baccalaureate candidates may enroll in undergraduate courses or equivalent graduate level courses. Though topics are similar to that of undergraduate teacher preparation coursework, the graduate credit equivalents are more intellectually rigorous, take advantage of the life experience brought by many post baccalaureate students, and instruction is designed for adult learners. Most graduate level courses are taught in the evenings or during summer sessions. Post-baccalaureate candidates may also elect to take certain graduate level professional education courses online (e.g. EDUC 6023).

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B.6. (Continuing Visit Only) What substantive changes have taken place in the Unit since the last visit (e.g., added/dropped programs/degrees; significant increase/decrease in enrollment; major reorganization of the Unit, etc.)? [These changes could be compiled from those reported in Part C of the AACTE/NCATE annual reports since the last visit.]

 

 

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B.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the Unit context may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

 

 

C.1. How does the Unit's conceptual framework address the following structural elements?

 

DEVELOPMENT, VISION and MISSION: The conceptual framework was created through a collaborative effort with on and off campus partners to reflect the vision and mission of the college. Constituents across the campus, the community, and in the professional development schools continued to be involved in the ongoing development of this living document. This work led to the development of our unit vision, mission, and philosophy:

 

Vision: West College of Education (WCoE) envisions a community of learners whose enhanced knowledge opens doors for all people.

 

Mission: The mission of WCoE, a community of learners, is to prepare successful, reflective professionals through the use of best practices.

 

Philosophy: The WCoE believes that learning changes both the individual and society and that developing resiliency and tolerance enhances an individual’s potential. Learning causes the individual to become a critical thinker and an effective problem solver. WCoE believes that individuals with a cause beyond self contribute to an informed, democratic, and synergistic society and strives to establish a reflective and collaborative community to enhance the potential of both the learner and society.

 

PURPOSES and GOALS: Moving from mission to philosophy statement to knowledge base is a deductive process that funnels toward greater specificity.An overriding assumption is that both candidates and faculty are included in the term “learner.” WCoE’s guiding principles shape the standards and desired outcomes for both. An organizing concept for these principles is “Let knowledge open doors.” To satisfy this most basic principle, candidates and faculty must meet 11 goals. The Unit associates certain defining knowledge, skills, and dispositions with each of these goals and believes they are essential to becoming a contributing member of the educational community. The knowledge, skills, and dispositions of each goal with supporting evidence may be found in the conceptual framework.

 

Goal 1 (Learning Environment): WCoE graduates and faculty create challenging, supportive, and learner centered environments in diverse settings.

 

Goal 2 (Individual Development): WCoE graduates and faculty demonstrate knowledge of individual differences in growth and development.

 

Goal 3 (Diverse Learners): WCoE graduates and faculty recognize the value and challenges of individual differences.

 

Goal 4 (Reflection): Graduates and faculty of the WCoE engage in individual and group reflection to improve practice.

 

Goal 5 (Collaboration, Ethics, Relationships): Graduates and faculty of WCoE develop positive relationships, use collaborative processes, and behave ethically.

 

Goal 6 (Communication): Graduates and Faculty of WCoE communicate effectively both verbally and nonverbally through listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

 

Goal 7 (Professional Development): Graduates and Faculty of WCoE actively engage in continuous learning and professional development.

 

Goal 8 (Strategies and Methods): Graduates and faculty of WCoE use a variety of instructional strategies aligned with content to actively engage diverse learners.

 

Goal 9 (Content Knowledge): Graduates and faculty of WCoE demonstrate mastery of their content area(s) and remain current in their teaching fields.

 

Goal 10 (Planning Process): Graduates and faculty of the WCoE demonstrate effective planning as part of the instructional cycle.

 

Goal 11 (Assessment): Graduates and faculty of the West College of Education demonstrate formative and summative techniques to plan, modify, and evaluate instruction.

 

The knowledge, skills, and dispositions of the Unit’s conceptual framework are aligned with Texas state standards as well as Specialized Program Areas as demonstrated in Appendix Afor initial programs and advanced programs. Specific knowledge, skills, and disposition standards associated with each goal and the scholarship supporting them may be found in the Conceptual Frameworkdocument.

 

Commitment to Diversity: The unit’s commitment to addressing the diverse needs of all P-12 students is embedded not only as a disposition, but also as knowledge and skills integrated throughout the coursework and field experiences of initial and advanced educator candidates. The unit’s faculty demonstrate their commitment to diversity by: (1) facilitating and utilizing practical experiences in multiple environments and with diverse learners; (2) planning, teaching, and explaining lessons that meet the needs of diverse learners; and (3) responding appropriately to learner differences throughout the coursework. Through these efforts, the desire of the unit is to develop students who demonstrate recognition of the value and challenges of individual differences. This occurs through field experiences, planning, and teaching mini-lessons in block courses as well as student teaching and responding to learner differences as evidenced in coursework and the Teacher Work Sample.

 

 

Commitment to Technology: The conceptual framework reflects the unit’s commitment to preparing candidates who are able to use educational technology to help all students learn. This is reflected in the technology standards for the state of Texas embedded in coursework, the TWS, and specifically the course EDUC 1023 Computer Applications. All initial candidates are required to take this introductory course, which is an exploration of word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software. The Unit’s commitment to instructional technology is supported by the use of technology in coursework and in the Professional Development Schools. All of the classrooms used by the WCoE on the campus of Midwestern State University are equipped with projection units, a PC, ELMO projection unit, and a DVD/VCR. A computer lab dedicated to students in the WCoE is available on campus.

 

In addition, most course work is integrated with the Blackboard course management system to allow for better use of learning time and individual development of students. Some courses in advanced preparation have been developed as exclusively on-line learning opportunities, and compressed video is still sometimes used to deliver the research courses and many of the courses in the Educational Leadership program. These courses also take advantage of Blackboard to allow interaction and correspondence with distance students. Students at distance sites regularly use technology to communicate with one another without travel to on-campus sites.

 

Assessment of Standards: The unit maintains and teaches its candidates that sound instructional decisions are based upon assessment data that is systematically collected, processed, analyzed, and shared. The unit’s assessment system functions as a continuous cycle that providing information that informs the unit’s day-to-day operation and the operation and evaluation of its programs. Matrix for Unit Assessment (Appendix C CF).

 

Structure: The assessment system is designed to determine eligibility for entrance into the West College of Education’s initial and advanced educator preparation programs and for continuous monitoring of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of candidates as they complete programs. The data collected from the programs are used to make decisions not only about preparation programs, but also about unit operations. The continuous cycle minimizes bias in assessment and improves overall operations of the unit.

 

Our assessment system depends upon participation by the unit faculty and other campus stakeholders through advisory groups. The NCATE Coordinator, Dean, and Chairs work with programs, departments, and the unit as a whole to provide the means and services necessary to gather data, analyze, and disseminate it on an annual basis. In addition, structured events are set for review of data and curriculum planning. Formative assessment data is collected throughout the year in each course, informing minor but immediate changes to better meet the needs of candidates and faculty.

 

Sequence of Initial and Advanced Candidate Decision: WCoE uses established transition points within our assessment system to review candidate performance. Shared assessments across programs provide opportunities for reflection and improvement. These transition points are outlined in the transition matrices. (Appendix B from CF)

 

Key Assessments for Initial Teacher Certification

 

A. The mini Teacher Work Sample is a measure of content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and effect on student learning. It is a record in the form of a written report of the candidates’ ability to carefully consider all contextual factors that might influence instruction, use those factors to plan and design a unit of instruction including an assessment plan that can demonstrate changes in student knowledge, skills, or dispositions resulting from the instruction. This serves as an assessment of lesson planning and is administered in Block 2

 

B. Pre-philosophy paper is a measure of dispositions that occurs in the initial teacher preparation course. The paper is designed as a measure of candidate dispositions prior to admission to the program

 

C. TExESContent Area- is a multiple choice examination that measures candidates’ mastery of Texas State Board for Teacher Certification (SBEC) for content areas

 

D. TExES Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities - is a multiple choice examination that measures candidates’ mastery of Texas State Board for Teacher Certification (SBEC) for PPR.

 

E. Field Experience Evaluation - The professional practice evaluation form is designed to provide formative and summative evaluation of candidates based upon four clusters:

Cluster 1: Planning for Learner-Centered Instruction

Cluster 2: A Classroom Environment that promotes Equity, Excellence, and Learning

Cluster 3: Instruction and Communication

Cluster 4: Professionalism

 

F. Teacher Work Sample - is an assessment used by many teacher preparation programs across the nation. Each education unit may adapt the TWS to their mission and framework, but the key components remain the same. Within our unit all initial teacher preparation programs require candidates to complete a Teacher Work Sample. A common scale of measurement is used across programs to allow for unit evaluation.

 

G. Field Experience Disposition Assessment – This is a measure of candidate dispositions at the end of field experience placement that is completed by the university supervisor

 

H. Alumni Assessment – This is a self-scored perception of the quality of preparation for teaching or other school personnel. It is a measure of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for the chose field of education.

 

I. Employer Survey – A survey distributed to the majority of administrators who employ our graduates. The assessment measures how well prepared our graduates are for their assigned positions.

 

J. Student Teacher Evaluations – Student teachers complete two different evaluations. One is a program evaluation that measures their perception of how well prepared they were by the unit for their field experience. The other evaluation measures candidates’ perceptions of their cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

 

 

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C.2. (Continuing Visits Only) What changes have been made to the conceptual framework since the last visit?

 

 

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C.3. (First Visits Only) How was the conceptual framework developed and who was involved in its development?

 

The Conceptual Frameworkresulted from a collaborative effort involving all faculty and staff in the Unit, representatives of all other colleges supporting teacher certification, and the local public schools. It was developed systematically over a period of several years, beginning in 2003. The WCoE steering committee designed the process to be purposeful and inclusive, maximizing stakeholder input. The first formal draft resulted from a working retreat dedicated to this task involving stake holders from the Unit and from the many public school partners and campus programs supporting teacher preparation. Later, in work sessions associated with regular faculty, focus group, and stakeholder meetings, the conceptual framework was edited and refined. Following the completion of these editing sessions, the draft framework was submitted to the NCATE Steering Committeefor final editing. Finally, before the conceptual framework document was adopted, summative review and input was requested of all stake holders.

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C.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the conceptual framework may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANDARDS

 

 

Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions

Candidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other school professionals know and demonstrate the content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and skills, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

 

 

1a. Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the Unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.

 

 

1a.1. What are the pass rates of teacher candidates in initial teacher preparation programs on state tests of content knowledge for each program and across all programs (i.e., overall pass rate)? Please complete Table 4 or upload your own table at Prompt 1a.5 below. [This information could be compiled from Title II data submitted to the state or from program reports prepared for national review.]

 

Table 4

Pass Rates on Content Licensure Tests for Initial Teacher Preparation

 

For Period:2008-2009

 

Exhibit for 1a.1 See Table

Pass Rates on Content Tests for Initial Teacher Preparation for the Period 2008-2009

 

 

 

 

1a.2 (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from other key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs demonstrate the content knowledge delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below.]

 

The following initial teacher certification programs were not nationally reviewed, but are state approved and have followed both state and professional association standards for program development: All Level Music, All Level Art, All Lever Theatre, 6-12 Business. All candidates are required to pass the appropriate state certification exam for content (TExES) and meet the minimum passing score (240) for certification. Content exams are administered to candidates during the second set (Block 2) of education courses. This content exam is aligned with state and national standards.

In addition, all candidates in these four areas are required to have a minimum grade point average on content courses of 2.6 for acceptance into student teaching. In addition, for approval to student teaching, candidates may not have less than a C in any content course. The required courses can be seen in the exhibit Grade Matrix for Application to Student Teaching

Art Content

Music Content Scores

Theatre Content Scores

Business Content Scores

Grade Matrix for Application to Student Teaching

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1a.3. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the content knowledge delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below.]

 

Three advanced programs were not nationally reviewed, the Master’s in Special Education with emphasis in Dyslexia, the School Counseling program, and the Master’s in Curriculum and Instruction program.

 

The School Counseling program utilizes the Texas Examination of Educator Standards (TExES) as the primary assessment of content knowledge. The domains on the exam include the following areas: Domain I – Understanding Students; Domain II – Planning and Implementing the Developmental and Guidance and Counseling Programs; Domain II – Collaboration, Consultation, and Professionalism. (See exhibit 1a.3 Content Knowledge for Advanced Candidates and Exhibit 1a.3 School Counseling Program Report)

 

The Master’s of Special Education Specializing in Dyslexia requires candidates to demonstrate an understanding of the following instructional strategies: simultaneous learning, multisensory learning, systematic learning, cumulative and direct instruction. This is accomplished through the National Alliance Exam accredited by IMSLEC. This exam measures the student’s understanding of both synthetic and analytic phonics as well as an understanding of simultaneous learning, multisensory learning, systemic learning and cumulative and direct instruction. (See Exhibit 1a.3 Content Knowledge for Advanced Candidates and Exhibit 1a.3 Dyslexia Program Report for SACS)

 

The candidates in the Master’s in Curriculum and Instruction demonstrate both an understanding of the variables that shape curriculum and the ability to write, review, and revise curriculum.This is assessed through successful completion of a Curriculum Review and Revision Project (EDUC 5633). The curriculum mapping project has 3 components [map of existing curriculum, map of proposed curriculum, rational for changes] and is scored from 0 – 20 using a rubric based upon the following criteria: 1) accuracy and degree of detail, 2) rationale for proposed changes, 3) supporting documentation, and 4) presentation style. A score ≥16 constitutes satisfactory completion. In addition, outcomes are assessed through successful completion of a Position Paper demonstrating an understanding of the variables that shape curriculum (EDUC 5633). Position Papers are scored using a rubric with the following criteria: 1) thesis [identifies and clarifies the candidate’s position], 2) rhetoric and reasoning [supports the thesis] 3) conclusions and implications [arising from the thesis], 4) APA style and documentation, and 5) quality of expression [organization, grammar, syntax, and usage]. A score of≥16 (of 20) is required for successful completion. (See Exhibit 1a.3 C&I Program Report)

Exhibit 1a.3 Content Knowledge for Advanced Candidates

Exhibit 1a.3 C & I Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 Dyslexia Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 School Counseling Program Report

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1a.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation in the content area? If survey data are being reported, what was the response rate? [A table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to content knowledge could be attached at Prompt 1a.5 below. The attached table could include all of the responses to your follow-up survey to which you could refer the reader in responses on follow-up studies in other elements of Standard 1.]

 

Every other year the WCoE evaluates the quality of its candidates’ (teaching field and pedagogical) content knowledge using an electronic survey that is sent to employers’ school email addresses in the regions of the state most likely to hire our graduates. The last round of surveys was sent to 309 employers. The survey was open for 3 months in the summer of 2009. The employers also received reminder notices throughout the summer. Fifty-four employers completed the survey, representing a return rate of 18%. Graduates of the programs are also surveyed on their perceptions of content knowledge. In addition, program completers and employers were surveyed to assess candidates’ demonstration of content knowledge. Candidate and employer responses suggest that candidates possess and demonstrate acceptable mastery of content knowledge. For the past three years, at the end of student teaching, Program Completers were administered an online survey asking their perception of program preparation for both teaching and pedagogical content. The response rate varied among programs (response rates for each are included in the tables). However, many preparation programs have very few or no candidates complete in a given year.

 

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys

 

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1a.5 (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the content knowledge of teacher candidates may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the Unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]

 

1b.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs demonstrate the pedagogical content knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.]

 

The state of Texas requires examinations of (1) content knowledge and (2) Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities Exam (PPR). For initial certification, candidates complete the PPR at the appropriate level of certification level for their field: elementary, middle, secondary, or all-level. The PPR assesses candidate competence in four domains:

 

Domain I:Designing instruction and assessments to promote student learning. (31% of the test)

Domain II: Creating a positive, productive classroom environment. (15% of the test)

Domain III: Implementing effective, responsive instruction and assessment including the assessment of Technology Applications Standards, I-V. (31% of the test)

Domain IV: Fulfilling professional roles and responsibilities. This exam measures candidates’ pedagogical content knowledge, student learning, assessment and responsibilities. (23% of the test)

 

(Table – Pass Rates for PPR By Content Area Table 1a.5)

 

In addition, candidates in secondary and all-level non-SPA programs (art, music, theater, and bilingual) demonstrate a thorough understanding of the relationship of content and content-specific pedagogy (including technology integration) in the following ways:

 

Assessment #3: Candidate ability to plan instruction (the Mini-Teacher Work Sample).

Assessment #4: Evaluation of student teaching.

 

These are unit assessments and are the same as those articulated in SPA reports.

 

The Mini-TWS is completed during Block 2 of the initial teacher candidate program with the exception of music candidates who complete their pedagogical training within their department’s prescribed sequence.The design for instruction criteria is evaluated on the Mini-TWS rubric by the following ratings: exceeds expectations, acceptable, and unacceptable.Summary data from the Mini-TWS shows 92.1% of the candidates scored either an exceeds expectations or acceptable performance rating for instruction. Sixty-nine percent of candidates scored an exceed expectations or acceptable performance rating for integrating technology.

 

The Student Teacher Evaluation Report assesses the candidate’s ability to present content-specific pedagogy.Cluster 1 of the assessment instrument evaluates the candidate’s ability to plan for learner-centered instruction.Standard A within Cluster 1 is focused on the candidate’s ability to demonstrate knowledge of content and pedagogy.Candidates are also assessed based upon their knowledge and ability to make use of technology during instructional delivery.Each standard is evaluated based upon the following rating scale: proficient, advanced competent, beginning competent, developing or not observed.

 

Exhibit 1b.1 PPR Art, MUSIC, THEATRE

Exhibit 1b.1 Art Mini TWS 07-10

Exhibit 1b.1 Art Student Teacher Evaluation

Exhibit 1b.1 EC-12 Music Vocal Student Teacher Evaluation

Exhibit 1b.1 EC-12 Music Instrument Student Teacher Evaluation

Exhibit 1b.1 Theatre Student Teacher Evaluations_0710

Exhibit 1b.1 Mini TWS

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1b.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates know and apply theories related to pedagogy and learning, are able to use a range of instructional strategies and technologies, and can explain the choices they make in their practice. [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.]

Candidates in the School Counseling program demonstrate the theories of counseling and the ability to facilitate classroom activities. Candidates take Theories I and Theories II courses prior to entering their field experience (practicum). In Theories I, Candidates demonstrate mastery of pedagogy through group methods. Successful completion is a prerequisite for enrolling for Theories II. In Theories II, Candidates demonstrate mastery of one-on-one counseling strategies. Both competencies are scored using a standard rubric.

 

Candidates for the Master’s of Special Education Specializing in Dyslexia demonstrate an understanding of therapy procedures, technical skills including timing and pacing, interactive instruction, appropriate verbalization and classroom management, the structure of written language (phonology, sound-symbol association, composition and written language development). Candidates demonstrate their understanding of therapy procedures and technical skills including timing and pacing, interactive instruction, appropriate verbalization, and classroom management by producing a one hour video of them working with a student with dyslexia. The demonstration is scored using a standard rubric using a scale from 1 (unsatisfactory) to 4 (mastery). Candidates must repeat this assessment if they score a 2 or below in any area.  

 

Candidates for the Master’s in Curriculum and Instruction (not nationally reviewed) must demonstrate advanced mastery of curriculum theory and practice and an in-depth understanding of contemporary theory related to pedagogy and learning. Candidates do this by successfully completing certain required coursework including EDUC 5633 Curriculum Theory and Practice, EDUC 6013 Trends and Issues in Learning and Teaching, and EDUC 5133 Technology Integration and by successfully completing a comprehensive written examination adopted with the2010-2012 Midwestern State University Graduate Catalog(see pg 88). The comprehensive written examination will consist of four essay questions supplied by the advanced candidate’s graduate committee.These questions will be drawn from the essential content and outcome expectations of the candidate’s degree program and will be scored by the advanced candidate’s graduate committee. Successful completion of the comprehensive written exam will require that the candidate’s graduate committee unanimously finds that all 4 questions on the exam are answered satisfactorily. Candidates also must successfully complete an Action Research Project and formal research report (file paper).The research project and report are scored by the same 3 member graduate faculty committee using college and departmental criteria for relevance, content, organization, and manuscript style (APA). A project and report are successfully completed when the candidate’s 3-member graduate committee agrees unanimously that all standards have been met.

Exhibit 1a.3 C & I Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 Dyslexia Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 School Counseling Program Report

 

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1b.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation in pedagogical content knowledge and skills? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to pedagogical content knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1b.4 below.]

 

The Unit conducts a continuing follow up study of graduates and employers using exit and employer surveys. The Teacher Preparation Survey is a self reported measure of the effectiveness of the Unit’s programs.It is completed by graduating Candidates. To date, the teacher preparation survey has had a completion rate of 20% for graduates. They survey for employers was an online survey mailed to 309 participants. It was open for 4 months and provided reminder prompts to recipients. The return rate for employers was 18%.

 

Survey items 2 (plan motivating instruction and assessment) and 6 (planning instruction and assessment to motivate) are indicators most specifically aligned to content-specific pedagogy. Item 2 found 87.7% of graduates felt either somewhat (61.2%) or completely prepared (26.5%) and Item 6 found 95.9% of graduates felt either somewhat (51.0%) or completely prepared (44.9%).

 

The Unit also surveys employers of new teachers graduating from the program. The Employer Survey in part assesses the graduate’s ability to effectively use pedagogical content knowledge and skills.Specific characteristics evaluated by the instrument include the ability of the candidate to:(1) use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, and methods to support learning for all students, and (2) apply theoretical knowledge and draw on practical experience to form best practices for the students in the classroom. Fifty-four (18%) of 309 surveys sent to employers were returned. One hundred per cent of the employers responding either strongly agreed (38.89%) or agreed (61.11%) that candidates used a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, and methods to support learning for all students. Ninety-six point three percent of respondents either strongly agreed (29.63%) or agreed (66.67%) that candidates were able to apply theoretical knowledge and draw upon practical experiences to form best practices for the students in the classroom, while 3.70% disagreed.

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys

 

 

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1b.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the pedagogical content knowledge of teacher candidates may be attached here. (Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.)

 

1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the Unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]

 

1c.1. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation and advanced teacher preparation programs demonstrate the professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards to facilitate learning? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.]

 

All levels of certification programs are approved by the state of Texas and are aligned with the state standards developed for each area and level. The state of Texas requires examinations of (1) content knowledge and (2) Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities Exam (PPR). For initial certification, candidates complete the PPR at the appropriate level of certification level for their field: elementary, middle, secondary, or all-level. The PPR assesses candidate competence in four domains:

 

Domain I:Designing instruction and assessments to promote student learning. 31% of the test.

Domain II:Creating a positive, productive classroom environment. 15% of the test

Domain III: Implementing effective, responsive instruction and assessment (including the assessment of Technology Applications Standards, I-V) 31% of the test

Domain IV: Fulfilling professional roles and responsibilities. 23% of the test. This exam measures candidates’ pedagogical content knowledge, student learning, assessment and

responsibilities.

All candidates for initial certification complete the TExES Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities (PPR) examination. Results are provided by certification level.

 

State standards for professional and pedagogical skills for candidates in initial teacher preparation are assessed through the ability to plan lessons (the Mini Teacher Work Sample unit assessment #3) and Field Experience Evaluation (unit assessment #5).

 

Exhibit 1c.1 Content Area PPR

Exhibit 1c.1 Min TWS Assessment Description

Exhibit 1c.1 Mini TWS Data

 

Advanced initial teacher certification candidates also take TExES exams in their area of specialization, and may be required to meet certain other program specific standards, complete capstone projects/file papers,a practicum experience, an oral comprehensive examination, a written comprehensive examination, an exit survey, and/or an employer survey depending upon their degree. TExES licensure examinations provide evidence of professional knowledge and skills of initial teacher candidates seeking certification in Texas.Initial teacher candidates are required to pass the certification specific Pedagogical and Professional Responsibilities (PPR) in their field

 

The final Student Teacher Evaluationreport measures each candidate’s professional knowledge and skills in four areas:(1) Planning for Learner-Centered Instruction, (2) Classroom Environment That Promotes Equity, (3) Instruction and Communication, and (4) Professionalism.

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1c.2. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs consider the school, family, and community contexts and the prior experiences of students; reflect on their own practice; know major schools of thought about schooling, teaching, and learning; and can analyze educational research findings? If a licensure test is required in this area, how are candidates performing on it? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.]

 

Initial teacher certification candidates consider students, school, family and community contexts and prior experiences when planning instruction and demonstrate this in the following ways:lesson and thematic unit plans, philosophy of learning paper (See exhibit 1c.2 Disposition Assessment), Teacher Work Sample (TWS), and mini Teacher Work Sample,.As student teachers, candidates completing section one of the TWS requirement and mini Teacher Work Sample (Contextual Factors) demonstrate knowledge of community, school, and classroom factors; knowledge of characteristics of students; knowledge of students’ varied approaches to learning; knowledge of students’ skills and prior learning; and implications for instructional planning and assessment and provide evidence that they use this information to make instructional decisions. The TExES PPR examination for all initial teacher candidates seeking certification also provides an assessment of candidates’ professional and pedagogical knowledge of school, family, community contexts and prior knowledge (Domains I, II, and Domain IV).

 

Evidence of student reflections on practice is also measured in section seven (Reflection and Self Evaluation) of the TWS and mini Teacher Work Sample, which requires student interns to reflect on their instruction and student learning in order to improve teaching practice. Students are required to provide an interpretation of student learning; insights on effective instruction and assessment; alignment among goals, instruction, and assessment; implications for future teaching; and implications for professional development.

 

Initial teacher candidates demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the theoretical and philosophical foundations of schooling, teaching, and learning in required coursework and through a variety of assessments including the Philosophy of Learning paper, Parenting Case Studies, Comprehensive Behavior Management plan (implemented in 2008-2009 EDUC 3162 and uploaded on TK-20).Initial teacher candidates apply knowledge and understanding of the major schools of thought about schooling, teaching, and learning in their field experience assignments.

 

Initial teacher candidates, as a part of their TWSs, use assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.Candidates are required to analyze TWS assessment data, including pre-/post- assessments and formative assessments, to determine student progress related to Unit learning goals.

 

Evidence of SPA programs can be seen in SPA reports

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Art

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Music

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Theatre

Exhibit 1c.1 Content Area PPR 2009-2010

Exhibit 1c.2 Disposition Assessment

Exhibit 1c.1 Min TWS Assessment Description

Exhibit 1c.1 Mini TWS Data

Exhibit 1c.2 EDUC 3162 Classroom Mgt

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1c.3. What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates reflect on their practice; engage in professional activities; have a thorough understanding of the school, family, and community contexts in which they work; collaborate with the professional community; are aware of current research and policies related to schooling, teaching, learning, and best practices; and can analyze educational research and policies and explain the implications for their own practice and the profession?

Candidates in the dyslexia program must demonstrate an understanding of state, federal and local learning disability and dyslexia legislation, guidelines and policy. The students are instructed to go to the state dyslexia website as well as the IMSLEC and ALTA websites concerning state, federal and local learning disability and dyslexia legislation, guidelines and policy. Students add this information to their portfolio that they utilize on their designated school campuses. The regional dyslexia director speaks to the class regarding state and federal regulations. In addition, the students attended a lecture by the director of dyslexia for the state of Texas. Students must pass (70 or above) the exam that tests them on their knowledge of the regulations. All students scored 90 or above on the exam.

 

Advanced candidates in Reading are required to conduct a Case Study Report (see SPA report), which evaluates the candidates’ ability to diagnose and analyze reading strengths and needs and to plan appropriate instruction.They engage in multiple professional activities including tutoring, analysis of student family background, interpreting assessment data, and reflecting on practice

 

Key assessments in the Educational Leadership program, including portfolios, principal/superintendent internships, school improvement plans, and campus budget analyses provide evidence that candidates have mastered the necessary professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills. Analysis of data for spring 2009, may be found in Assessment #4, Part B, of the Educational Leadership SPA Report.

 

School Counseling candidates must demonstrate an understanding of students on Domain 1 of the TExES School Counselors Exam

 

Exhibit 1a.3 C & I Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 Dyslexia Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 School Counseling Program Report

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1c.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' preparation related to professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1c.5 below.]

 

The Unit surveyed 309 principals, superintendents, and human resources directors who were most likely to employ graduates of the West College of Education. The return rate was 18%. Responses from participating employers suggested they are satisfied with the performance of WCoE graduates. Those areas with the highest rating were in collaborating to write lesson plans while maintaining positive relationships; creating learning activities that are relevant to students and instructional goals; and integrating technology into daily work. The area that received the most ‘disagree’ responses were in applying formative and summative assessment throughout the lesson cycle, using a variety of formal and informal strategies to measure student competency, and applying theoretical knowledge and drawing on practical experience to form best practice.

 

Results of the surveys sent to candidates completing initial teacher preparation program indicate the most satisfaction creating classrooms that are physically and emotionally safe, understanding strategies for creating productive learning environments, engaging students, and monitoring student performance. The areas where student reported lower perceptions include applying knowledge of human development to planning, planning instruction and assessment that is motivational, and understanding strategies for managing student behavior.

 

Graduates of the advanced programs in Educational Leadership reported the most satisfaction with promoting a positive school culture, managing school operations, and acting with integrity. Areas for possible growth include influencing the larger context of schools, designing comprehensive professional growth plans, and mobilizing community resources. For the school counseling program, the highest ratings included understanding diversity, utilizing individual and small group approaches, and constructive partnerships. The lowest ratings centered on crisis intervention strategies and data analysis.

 

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys

 

 

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1c.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills of teacher candidates may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

1c.5 data are included in previously attached tables:

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys

 

1d. Student Learning for Teacher Candidates. [In this section the Unit must address (1) initial teacher preparation programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and, if the institution offers them, (2) licensure and non-licensure graduate programs for teachers who already hold a teaching license.]

 

1d.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates in initial teacher preparation programs can assess and analyze student learning, make appropriate adjustments to instruction, monitor student learning, and develop and implement meaningful learning experiences to help all students learn? [Data for initial teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]

 

Data from art, music, theater, business, and bilingual candidates (not nationally reviewed) are included in this section. Unit Assessment #3 ( Mini-TWS), Unit Assessment #4 (Student Teacher Evaluation Report) and Unit Assessment #5 (TWS) allow candidates to demonstrate their knowledge and ability to measure and analyze student learning, monitor student progress, and make appropriate adjustments to instruction include.

 

Summary data from the Mini-TWS demonstrates 90% of the art, theatre, and bilingual candidates meet or exceed the acceptable performance rating for developing an assessment plan and analyzing student learning.The TWS is completed during the student teaching component of the initial teacher education program and measures the candidate’s ability to plan assessment and analyze student learning.The rubric scale rates candidates as meets expectations, partially meets expectations, or does not meet expectations.

 

The summary data aligned to assessment and analysis of student learning indicates 82% of all art, music, theater, business, bilingual undergraduate and post-baccalaureate candidates over the 3 year period met program performance rating expectations.The Student Teacher Evaluation Report collects data that evaluates the candidate’s ability to assess student learning.Cluster 3 of the assessment instrument evaluates the candidate’s ability to assess learner-centered instruction.Standard D within Cluster 3 is focused on the candidate’s ability to assess student learning.Each standard is evaluated based upon the following rating scale: proficient, advanced competent, beginning competent, developing or not observed.

 

Summary data for teacher candidates indicate that the following competencies: art – 100% proficient, music – 25% advanced competent and 75% beginning competent, theater – 100% proficient, bilingual -17% proficient, 33% advanced competent, 33% beginning competent, and 17% developing.Data tables are included in section 1d.4 for each of the identified assessment standards.

 

Exhibit 1c.1 Min TWS Assessment Description

Exhibit 1c.1 Mini TWS Data

Exhibit 1b.1 Art Student Teacher Evaluation

Exhibit 1b.1 EC-12 Music Vocal Student Teacher Evaluation

Exhibit 1b.1 EC-12 Music Instrument Student Teacher Evaluation

Exhibit 1b.1 Theatre Student Teacher Evaluations_0710

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Art

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Music

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Theatre

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1d.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that advanced teacher candidates demonstrate a thorough understanding of the major concepts and theories related to assessing student learning; regularly apply them in their practice; analyze student, classroom, and school performance data; make data-driven decisions about strategies for teaching and learning; and are aware of and utilize school and community resources that support student learning? [Data for advanced teacher preparation programs that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]

 

School Counseling candidates demonstrate their knowledge of major concepts and methods in quantitative and qualitative research by completing a major research project and report on a topic that directly impacts students in schools. Candidates learn research skills in two courses: Introduction to Research and Applied Research. A committee of three faculty members approves the research project. One faculty member serves as the chair of the committee and directly supervises student work. The quality and understanding of the research is evaluated using a rubric.

 

Candidates in the Master’s of Special Education Specializing in Dyslexia demonstrate an understanding of the instructional strategies (simultaneous, multisensory, systemic and cumulative and direct instruction. Students must pass the IMSLEC accredited Alliance Exam. The Alliance Exam measures candidates’ understanding of both synthetic and analytic phonics as well as an understanding of simultaneous, multisensory, systemic, and cumulative direct instruction.

 

Candidates in the Masters in Curriculum and Instruction program demonstrate advanced understanding of the major concepts and theories related to assessing student learning and regularly apply them by analyzing student, classroom, and school performance data and using this data to make instructional decisions while making use of available school and community resources that support student learning.C&I candidates document these things by conducting classroom action research and writing a formal research report.The research report allows advanced candidates to demonstrate their knowledge of the historical and theoretical foundations of curriculum and pedagogy and how they apply them in their practice.The Unit implemented a comprehensive written examination in fall of 2010.The comprehensive exam consists of 4 essay questions supplied by the candidate’s graduate committee and drawn from the essential content of the candidate’s degree program.

 

Exhibit 1a.3 C & I Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 Dyslexia Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 School Counseling Program Report

 

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1d.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' ability to help all students learn? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to the ability to help all students learn could be attached at Prompt 1d.4 below.]

 

The Unit administers a follow-up study of graduates and employers through Teacher Preparation Survey and the Employer Survey.

 

The Teacher Preparation Survey had a completion rate of 18%.The survey responses were (1) not at all prepared, (2) somewhat unprepared, (3) somewhat prepared, and (4) completely prepared.Item 2 (plan motivating instruction and assessment), Item 6 (planning instruction and assessment to motivate), and Item 14 (monitoring student progress) are indicators most specifically aligned to this standard.

 

Item 2: 87.7% of the respondents reported they were either somewhat (61.2%) or completely (26.5%) prepared.

Item 6: 95.9% of respondents reported they were either somewhat (51.0%) or completely (44.9%) prepared

Item 14: 89.8% of candidates reported they were somewhat (49.0%) or completely (40.8%) prepared.

 

Elements of the Employer Survey assess the graduate’s ability to help all students learn.The response rate was 18% (n=54/309). Specific characteristics assessed include the ability of the candidate to (1) plan, design, and teach lessons that meet all students’ needs; (2) plan, modify, adjust, and monitor instruction to accommodate the needs of all students; (3) use a variety of assessment tools and practices; and (4) apply a variety of formative and summative assessments. The survey responses were strongly agree, agree, disagree, strongly disagree and no response.

 

1. Most (96.3%) respondents either strongly agreed (25.93%) or agreed (70.37%) that candidates plan, design, and teach lessons that meet all students’ needs; 3.70% disagreed.

2. The majority (96.3%) of respondents either strongly agreed (33.33%) or agreed (62.96%) that candidates were able to plan, modify, adjust, and monitor instruction to accommodate the needs of all students; 3.70% disagreed.

3Almost all (98.15%) respondents either strongly agreed (25.93%) or agreed (72.22%) that candidates were able to use a variety of assessment tools and practices, while 1.85% disagreed.

4. Most (94.44% ) respondents either strongly agreed (27.78%) or agreed (66.67%) that candidates were able to apply a variety of formative and summative assessment throughout the learning cycle; 5.56% disagreed.

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys

 

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1d.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to student learning may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

1e. Knowledge and Skills for Other School Professionals

 

1e.1. What are the pass rates of other school professionals on licensure tests by program and across all programs (i.e., overall pass rate)? Please complete Table 5 or upload your own table at Prompt 1e.4 below.

 

Table 5

Pass Rates on Licensure Tests for Other School Professionals

 

2007-2010

For Period:  

 

 

Program

 

Name of Licensure Test

 

# of Test Takers

% Passing State Licensure Test

Overall Pass Rate for the Unit (across all programs for the preparation of other

school professionals)

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

1e.2. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from other key assessments indicate that other school professionals demonstrate the knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards? [Data for programs for other school professionals that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1e.4 below.]

 

All certification programs for Other School Professional are approved by the State of Texas and meet the specific standards delineated for each category of certification. This includes the Master in School Counseling program and the Master in Special Education Dyslexia program. Both programs have a 100% pass rate on their respective exams.

 

The Master’s in Curriculum & Instruction does not have a state certification exam and no state standards specifically address this degree. Demonstration of knowledge and skills for institutional standards is summarized below:

 

1. Successful completion of EDUC 6013 and a Position Paper addressing a contemporary issue related to teaching or learning. Scored by instructor.

2. Successful completion of EDUC 5633, a Curriculum Review Project, and a Position Paper addressing a topic related to curriculum, curriculum development, or curriculum review in the public schools. Scored by instructor.

3. Successful completion of EDUC 6753, Action Research Project, and Formal Research Report (file paper). Scored by instructor and a 3 member faculty graduate committee.

4. Successful completion of all courses in the C&I major and cognate (>3.0 composite gpa).

5. Successful completion of a Comprehensive Written Examination. Scored by a 3 member faculty graduate committee.

 

 

Exhibit 1a.3 C & I Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 Dyslexia Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 School Counseling Program Report

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1e.3. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about the knowledge and skills of other school professionals? If survey data are being reported, what was the response rate? [A table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to knowledge and skills could be attached at Prompt 1e.4 below. The attached table could include all of the responses to your follow-up survey to which you could refer the reader in responses on follow-up studies in other elements of Standard 1.]

 

General feedback from employers is available from the Employer Survey completed every 2 years. Graduate survey data from program completers is available in exhibit…The Unit will continue to broaden the use of annual feedback data from employers and graduates. Program Completer Surveys are administered every year in all initial teacher preparation programs and are provided in exhibit

 

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys

 

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1e.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the knowledge and skills of other school professionals may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

1f. Student Learning for Other School Professionals

 

1f.1. (Programs Not Nationally Reviewed) What data from key assessments indicate that candidates can create positive environments for student learning, including building on the developmental levels of students; the diversity of students, families, and communities; and the policy contexts within which they work? [Data for programs for other school professionals that have been nationally reviewed or reviewed through a similar state review do not have to be reported here. Summarize data here only for programs not already reviewed. A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1f.3 below.] 

 

Candidates in programs for preparation of other school professionals (OSP) promote student learning through assessment, counseling, consultation and collaboration with teachers and leadership.These candidates impact student learning in both direct and indirect ways.OSP candidates impact student learning by assessing and planning for students’ learning and/or by working in various roles with teachers and other school staff who interact directly with students to promote learning.In both direct and indirect areas of responsibility, candidates promote positive educational environments that support student learning.Further, these candidates collect and analyze data and make decisions related to student learning.Finally, candidates must reflect on their own work related to student learning.

 

Candidates in the Master of Education in School Counseling program complete a research-based file paperthat demonstrates their ability and readiness to become counselors. In addition, candidates are required to present a taped counseling sessionin the Theories and Techniques II class as a demonstration of the counseling skills required as a prerequisite for the field experience required by the School Counseling program and the State of Texas. At Program Exit, School Counseling candidates take the TExES School Counselor Exam, which addresses components of a developmental guidance program, methodology, and professional ethics and requirements. All candidates who have attempted the exam since September 1, 2007, have successfully passed. See the TExES for School Counselor.

 

Candidates completing the Master of Education in Special Education Dyslexia program complete field experience over the course of two years.During that time they are observed two or more times a semester.Their field experience is evaluated based on the criteriaof the International Multisensory Structured Language Education Council(IMSLEC). Candidates in the Dyslexia program complete 700 hours of a field-based practicum.At the completion of the program, they are qualified to take the National Alliance Examinationthrough the Academic Language Therapist’s Association for licensure as a Dyslexia Therapist.

 

Exhibit 1a.3 C & I Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 Dyslexia Program Report

Exhibit 1a.3 School Counseling Program Report

 

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1f.2. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates' ability to create positive environments for student learning? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to the ability to create positive environments for student leaning could be attached at Prompt 1f.3 below.]

 

Refer to the employer and graduate survey in the exhibits

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys

 

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1f.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to other school professionals' creation of positive environments for student learning may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

1g. Professional Dispositions for All Candidates. [Indicate when the responses refer to the preparation of initial teacher candidates, advanced teacher candidates, and other school professionals, noting differences when they occur.]

 

1g.1. What professional dispositions are candidates expected to demonstrate by completion of programs?

 

The Unit has 11 overarching goals related to its principle “Let knowledge open doors.” Each of these goals has a related disposition. These dispositions are introduced during the introductory teacher preparation course (EDUC 2013 School and Society) and are emphasized throughout the program. Dispositions are assessed at key points during and at the end of the initial teacher certification. Advanced programs measure these dispositions via course work assignments, culminating experiences, or field experiences.

 

Candidates believe in meeting the instructional needs of all students, are commitment to professionalism and ethical standards, and desire to communicate effectively with colleagues, family members, and students to make them partners in education. Candidates believe that all children can learn and that teachers must respond to students’ constantly changing individual developmental needs. Candidates appreciate the contributions made by differing ethnic, racial, disability, gender, and socioeconomic backgrounds of their students and the families from which they come. Candidates believe that personal and professional reflection is an important part of their learning and teaching and let strong ethical standards guide them in their decision making while working with students and colleagues. Candidates believe that strong communication skills are essential to being an effective teacher and value professional development and lifelong learning. Candidates believe that teaching is a complex blend of science and art and that teaching requires mastery of content in subject areas. Candidates believe that proper planning for learning is essential to student acquisition of knowledge and skills as part of the teaching cycle and in the educational value of formative and summative assessment of student learning.

 

Exhibit 1g.1 

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1g.2. How do candidates demonstrate that they are developing professional dispositions related to fairness and the belief that all students can learn? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]

 

As a part of the introductory course to the preparation program (EDUC 2013 School and Society), initial certification candidates write a pre-philosophy paper explaining why they want to become a teacher. Candidates explain how they believe children learn best and the qualities teachers should have, focusing specifically on ethical practices and fairness. Candidates are assessed on 11 dispositions including the disposition towards fairness and the belief that all students can learn using a three point rubric. During the Planning and Assessment course, candidates provide a lesson plan that indicates, in part, how their decisions in teaching will provide for a fair and equitable approach to teaching and learning. The knowledge and skills required are measured along with the dispositions toward teaching and learning using a three point rubric.

 

The advanced program in School Leadership includes a measure of fairness on all assignments. The belief of that program is that every decision a school administrator makes should be a fair and ethical decision. This measure occurs throughout the program including the internship. Several key assignments during the preparation program for administrators also address student learning decisions. For example, during the Community Politics and Public Relations course, candidates design a comprehensive learning support system for a school. This assignment, in addition to other skills, measures dispositions towards fairness and has a focus on student learning. Examples of assessment are included in 1g.5.

 

Exhibit 1g.2 Pre-Philosophy Guide

Exhibit 1g.2 Data for Disposition Assessment EDUC 2013 2009-2010

Exhibit 1g. Field Experience Disposition Assessment 

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1g.3. What data from key assessments indicate that candidates demonstrate the professional dispositions listed in 1.g.1 as they work with students, families, colleagues, and communities? [A table summarizing these data could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]

 

The Unit piloted its pre-philosophy disposition assessment during the introductory education course (EDUC 2013School and Society) in the spring of 2009. Since that time the disposition assessment has been administered in each section of that course. The strongest responses for this measure have been towards the disposition that all children can learn, and that teachers must respond to students’ constantly changing individual developmental needs. Most dispositions during this assessment reflected the Unit’s expectations. Areas for possible growth include the dispositions towards reflection, communication, and assessment. The disposition assessment that occurs in the planning and assessment course identified candidates’ strength in dispositions towards learning goals and sound professional practice in instructional development. Areas for continued growth include dispositions towards reflection, professional development, making modifications for student learning, and assessment.

 

The Field Experience Disposition Assessment was conducted for the first time by university supervisors in the spring of 2010. At the end of the field experience, the supervisors submitted their interpretation of candidate dispositions. The areas of strength included strong ethical standards/fairness towards decision making, communications skills as a part of effective teaching, the complex blending of science and art in teaching, and mastery of content area. The areas for possible improvement in the program include value of professional development and reflection on teaching. Candidate dispositions towards diversity met Unit expectations, but will be monitored continuously as program adjustments are made. Summarized data are included in 1g.5.

 

Exhibit 1c.2 Disposition Assessment

Exhibit 1g.2 Data for Disposition Assessment EDUC 2013 2009-2010

Exhibit 1g.2 EDUC 4106 Mini TWS Disposition

Exhibit 1g.1 Student Teacher Disposition Assessment Spring 2010

Exhibit 1g.2 Disposition Assessment Block 2

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1g.4. What do follow-up studies of graduates and employers indicate about graduates'

demonstration of professional dispositions? If survey data have not already been reported, what was the response rate? [If these survey data are included in a previously attached table, refer the reader to that attachment; otherwise, a table summarizing the results of follow-up studies related to professional dispositions could be attached at Prompt 1g.5 below.]

 

Over the summer of 2009, 309 school administrators, superintendents, and human resources directors throughout the north central Texas region were surveyed on the dispositions of WCoE graduates (initial and advanced) in their employ. The return rate was 18% (54/309). The survey measured administrators’ perceptions of teaching related knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Respondents reported general satisfaction with the dispositions of WCoE graduates and their preparation. The greatest satisfaction was reported in dispositions towards instructional practices and collaboration. Though only a small number of respondents reported any dissatisfaction with the professional dispositions of WCoE graduates, those that might be cited for possible growth were reflection, accommodating individual differences, and assessment as part of the daily process. The most common deficit reported (3/54) was disposition toward assessment. Results of the survey can be found in 1g.5 and are labeled Employer Survey of KSD.

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1g.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to professional dispositions may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

Exhibit 1c.2 Disposition Assessment

Exhibit 1g.2 Data for Disposition Assessment EDUC 2013 2009-2010

Exhibit 1g.2 EDUC 4106 Mini TWS Disposition

Exhibit 1g.1 Student Teacher Disposition Assessment Spring 2010

Exhibit 1g.2 Disposition Assessment Block 2

Employer Survey of KSD

 

 

Optional

 

1. What does your Unit do particularly well related to Standard 1?

 

 

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2. What research related to Standard 1 is being conducted by the Unit or its faculty?

 

 

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STANDARD 2. ASSESSMENT SYSTEM AND UNIT EVALUATION

 

The Unit has an assessment system that collects and analyzes data on the applicant qualifications, the candidate and graduate performance, and Unit operations to evaluate and improve the Unit and its programs.

 

2a. Assessment System

 

2a.1. How does the Unit ensure that the assessment system collects information on candidate proficiencies outlined in the Unit's conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards?

 

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approves all degrees offered, with a specific process for educator certification. The number of hours for professional education courses allowed in a candidate’s program of study is limited by the Texas legislature. In addition the Texas legislature limits the total number of hours that can lead to a degree to 120 credit hours, unless a special waiver is permitted. In the state of Texas, candidates cannot major in education.

 

The Texas Education Agency oversees the work of the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC). SBEC develops and revises the professional teaching standards and certification exams for all educator candidates. All certification programs offered at Texas institutions of higher education are approved by SBEC. This includes a review of the appropriate admission requirements, aligned standards, delivery, established benchmarks, and use of assessment results for program improvement. Unit assessment data for licensure assessment in both content areas (#1) and professional pedagogy (#6) and responsibilities is made available and downloaded from the SBEC website.

 

The educator preparation program at Midwestern State University is aligned with the Texas Standards for Educator Certification, the Texas Beginning Educator Support System, and the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards. In addition, specific programs are aligned to National Specialized Program Area Standards.

 

In 2007, the Unit purchased access to an online assessment system (TK20) to collect, organize, analyze, and store candidate performance data at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Each degree/certification program has common key assessments that are assigned to specific courses or experiences. These key assessments are aligned with specialty program area (SPA) standards. The key assessments from which data are collected through this system include lesson planning (#3), field experience evaluation (#4), impact on student learning (#5), and employer and graduate surveys. At the advanced level, most knowledge and all skill assessments in the Educational Leadership Building and District level are collected, analyzed, and stored using this system. Each of the proficiencies outlined in the conceptual framework is aligned to national SPA standards as well as state standards. Each faculty member responsible for a key assessment rates candidate performance using a common, online rubric. Data from these assessments are disaggregated and analyzed by the faculty.

 

Disposition assessment data are collected as part of a philosophy paperwritten in the introductory education course (EDUC 2013 School and Society). This data is collected through the online assessment system. It is scored using an online rubric that specifically addresses the dispositions of the Unit. Dispositions are also assessed through an observation tool in the Planning and Assessmentcourse for undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students. Faculty members who teach these courses use an observation checklist reflecting the key points of the dispositions for candidates. Lastly, the Unit regularly conducts employer evaluations for graduates using the online assessment system. An electronic survey is emailed to all employers in the three regions most likely to employ WCoE graduates. Employers are asked to report the degree to which WCoE graduates reflect dispositions listed on the survey. Key assessment data from performance on state certification exams are collected from Texas SBEConline databases. Candidate performance data are distributed to appropriate faculty members both within the Unit and across campus to other departments and content areas. This data comprise results of the appropriate content area examination as well as results of the professional pedagogy and responsibilities exam.

 

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2a.2. What are the key assessments used by the Unit and its programs to monitor and make decisions about candidate performance at transition points such as those listed in Table 6? Please complete Table 6 or upload your own table at Prompt 2a.6 below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2a.3. How is the Unit assessment system evaluated? Who is involved and how?

The assessment system is designed to determine eligibility for entrance into the West College of Education initial and advanced educator preparation programs and for continuous monitoring of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of candidates as they complete programs. The data collected from the programs are used to make decisions not only about preparation programs, but also about unit operations. The continuous cycle serves as an effort to eliminate bias in assessment and improve overall operations of the unit.

 

Our assessment system is dependent on participation by the unit faculty along with joint effort from across the campus and through advisory groups. The NCATE Coordinator, Dean, and Department Chairs work with programs, departments, and the unit as a whole to provide the means and services necessary to gather data, analyze, and disseminate on an annual basis. In addition, structured events are set for review of data and curriculum planning. In addition, formative assessment data is collected throughout the year in each course where minor but immediate changes can be made to better meet the needs of the candidates and faculty.

 

The NCATE Coordinator, along with the certification office, assist faculty in the regular collection of data for program specific assessments. The NCATE coordinator assists faculty with entering assessment data through an electronic assessment system. In addition, the NCATE coordinator creates assessment reports for review and analysis by faculty and distributes program data to faculty members and program chairs for their use in program improvement.

 

Data from state-mandate assessments are collected by the certification office and NCATE coordinator. For example, all TExES content and pedagogy/professional responsibility data are downloaded from the state data base through the State Board of Educator Certification.

 

At the unit level the Dean of the college (NCATE Coordinator) prepares and shares data at a yearly event. Each October, data from the previous year on key assessments are analyzed by the faculty and recommendations for program changes are recorded. The same data review/action report is used to maintain a record of what the data analysis reflects, what actions are to be taken with justification, the next steps, and who is responsible for the actions. An overview of the unit process is included in the appendix.

 

The primary advisory group for the West College of Education is the Teacher Education Committee. This committee serves two essential purposes. First, the committee serves as the primary overview body for the Unit Assessment System. In that capacity the committee reviews assessment and program information from the NCATE Coordinator, Dean, faculty, and Office of Certification. This information is used to make decisions about overall unit functions including oversight of the unit assessment system. All assessment data at the unit and program level are shared with the teacher education committee. Recommendations from the committee in assessment changes are directed to the college faculty. Second, this committee serves as the admission committee into the initial teacher certification program. Each member of the committee, including the Dean of the West College of Education, has one vote.

 

Exhibit 2a.3 Assessment System

 

 

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2a.4. How does the Unit ensure that its assessment procedures are fair, accurate, consistent, and free of bias?

 

The Unit uses the following measures ensure assessment is consistent, accurate, unbiased, and fair:

1) To create consistent assessments the unit conducts analysis of inter-rater reliability through the use of statistical analysis. In addition, inter-rater reliability training is periodically conducted to measure to eliminate bias in scoring rubrics for key assessments. The unit has adopted a set of key assessments that all candidates complete for initial or advanced programs. Assignment directions are periodically reviewed by faculty or the assessment committee for accuracy. Possible changes to assessments can be requested through the shared governance policy of the unit.

2) Accurate assessments are developed through faculty input and collaboration at the program level. Multiple faculty members monitor and develop the assessment tools and their alignment with knowledge, skills, dispositions, and professional standards. In addition, the unit uses multiple measures of most standards. Data from multiple points are compared to identify inconsistencies and to eliminate bias.

3) Unbiased assessment is monitored through the periodic review of assessment data comparing performance across possible discriminatory descriptors. Key assessments such as the TWS, Impact on Student Learning, and Field Experience Evaluation are scored by multiple raters (facultyTWS raters, field experience supervisors, cooperating teachers). Training provided to university supervisors and cooperating teachers minimizes scoring bias. Inter-rater reliability training is provided on key assessments on an annual basis to ‘recalibrate’ the faculty. Rubrics are written with specific descriptors to encourage objective assessment and inter-rater reliability

4) Fair assessments have been created through alignment with knowledge, skills, dispositions, and professional standards. The knowledge, skills, dispositions, and appropriate professional standards for each course are listed along with course objectives in each syllabus. Assessments are made at appropriate points to ensure adequate instruction has occurred. Directions for the assessment as well as scoring rubrics are provided to the students prior to completion of work.

5) The unit maintains an advisory committee that regularly evaluates assessments for initial and advanced certifications. This committee reviews current assessments, makes recommendations for changes, and maintains coordination and cooperation between departments within the Unit and other stakeholders across the university. This committee also makes recommendations to the Teacher Education Committee regarding assessments.

 

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2a.5. What assessments and evaluation measures are used to manage and improve the operations and programs of the Unit?

 

All educator preparation programs at Midwestern State University have been approved by the State Board for educator Certification (SBEC) and by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) in accordance with principles, legislative mandates, and standards required for program approval. The unit’s educator preparation programs are required to be in compliance with all state mandates related to teacher certification program and makes changes as state mandates require. The Teacher Education Committee serves as the advisory council to the program and uses empirical data and feedback to make decisions affecting the teacher preparation program.

 

The teacher preparation program is evaluated and assessed in several ways. The Unit’s authority to recommend candidates for certification is reaffirmed every 5 years, following a formal TEA evaluation of the teacher preparation program. The Unit was last evaluated and approved in March of 2010. The report can be found at the following link: Exhibit 2a.5 Final Findings

 

The program is subject to Title II reporting. Title II reports provide data regarding overall performance as well as performance by minority groups. The report is available at: Pass Rates on Content Tests

 

Each year the Texas Legislative Budget Boad (LBB) asks for data on completer pass rates. The LBB calculates pass rates in a different method. LBB Report.

 

Other assessment data used to manage and improve operations of the program are made available to the Teacher Education Committee and is summarized as follows:

 

1. The mini Teacher Work Sample is a measure lesson planning.

2. TExESContent Area- is a multiple choice examination that measures candidates’ mastery of Texas State Board for Teacher Certification (SBEC) for content areas

3. TExES Pedagogy and ProfessionalResponsibilities - is a multiple choice examination that measures candidates’ mastery of Texas State Board for Teacher Certification (SBEC) for PPR.

4. Field Experience Evaluation- The professional practice evaluation form is designed to provide formative and summative evaluation of candidates based upon four clusters:

5. Teacher Work Sample-. Within our unit all initial teacher preparation programs require candidates to complete a Teacher Work Sample. A common scale of measurement is used across programs to allow for unit evaluation.

6. Field Experience Disposition Assessment– This is a measure of candidate dispositions at the end of field experience placement that is completed by the university supervisor

7. Alumni Assessment– This is a self-scored perception of the quality of preparation for teaching or other school personnel. It is a measure of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for the chose field of education.

8. Employer Survey– A survey distributed to the majority of administrators who employ our graduates. The assessment measures how well prepared our graduates are for their assigned positions.

9. Student Teacher Evaluations– Student teachers complete two different evaluations. One is a program evaluation that measures their perception of how well prepared they were by the unit for their field experience. The other evaluation measures candidates perceptions of their cooperating teacher and university supervisor

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2a.6. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the Unit's assessment system may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

2b. Data Collection, Analysis, and Evaluation

 

2b.1. What are the processes and timelines used by the Unit to collect, compile, aggregate, summarize, and analyze data on candidate performance, Unit operations, and program quality?

 

Applicants to the program complete a formrequiring them to respond to the specific program admission data. Data are entered into a database by the administrative assistant for the teacher certification program. This administrative assistant reviews applicant qualifications including calculation of minimum GPA requirements. The data from each round of applicants are provided to the Teacher Education Committee for review. The Teacher Education Committee, comprised of deans and departments chairs from content areas, reviews applicant data and approves admission.

 

Candidate coursework and field experience data are collected through an online assessment system called TK20. This system allows candidates to submit student work online throughout their courses and field experiences. Faculty members assigned to courses then score Candidates’ work using common rubrics aligned to national SPA standards. Candidates submit some key assessments directly through the online assessment system (TK20); however, coursework based assessments may also collected by other online course management systems (e.g. Blackboard). In this case faculty members score the work using a common rubric and then transfer the scores to the online assessment system. Candidates in field experience must submit their impact on student learning assignment (Teacher Work Sample) through the online assessment system. WCoE faculty members are assigned Teacher Work Samples to score based upon their teaching specialization. In addition, candidates are evaluated by a university supervisor and cooperating teacher using a common observation form (extended version). The university supervisor and cooperating teacher use program specific guides to inform their decision making processes. These guides provide SPA specific guiding questions to help supervisors determine the extent to which candidates meet the criteria on the observation form. Each form can be seen in the SPA report.

 

Candidates are also given the opportunity to complete program evaluations specific to their level and content areas. Candidates complete these surveys during student teaching.

 

Graduates are surveyed on a biannual basis. Graduates are asked to complete program evaluations to provide feedback on the quality of their preparation to teach. The last time this was done the survey was completed using a paper-pencil hard copy survey. In the future, the survey will be conducted using the TK20 online assessment system. Employers of the graduates are also asked to complete program satisfaction surveys on an annual basis. This is also conducted through the TK20 assessment system.

 

Data from individual courses are analyzed by the teaching faculty each semester. Faculty members are responsible for analyzing data for the course(s) they teach. The faculty members are able to print aggregate reports from their course work for this purpose. If multiple sections of a course exist, all teachers of that course coordinate their analysis. A data analysis sheet is included in binders kept by faculty. Each semester results of the Teacher Work Sample, Field Experience Observation, State Certification data for Professional Pedagogy and Responsibilities, and Student Teacher Evaluations are distributed to the faculty for analysis and recommendations to the Unit. Data are gathered, aggregated, and distributed by the NCATE coordinator to the faculty. Data from content area certification exams are aggregated, analyzed, and distributed to content area faculty across campus annually. In addition, performance reports for the Teacher Work Sample, Field Experience Observation, and Student Teacher Evaluations are disaggregated by subject area and distributed to the Teacher Education Committee. The committee representatives use this data for programmatic decision making. Although most content area faculty do not provide methods courses related to their subject, the Unit believes that sharing the information can provide some feedback about Candidate performance.

 

Data from key assessments are downloaded from the online assessment system. The data are aggregated in spreadsheet formats and hard copies are distributed to faculty in small groups for analysis. Data from certification exams are downloaded from the state websiteby the administrative assistant for certification. This data are loaded into spreadsheets and kept on a public drive that can only be accessed by a few authorized persons, including the NCATE coordinator, certification office, and one administrative assistant. Data are distributed to content faculty and Unit faculty on an as-needed basis for analysis. The NCATE coordinator analyzes data for subject area certification tests for average overall scores by content domain.

Exhibit 2b.1 Assessment System Matricies

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2b.2 How does the Unit disaggregate candidate assessment data for candidates on the main campus, at off-campus sites, in distance learning programs, and in alternate route programs?

 

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2b.3. How does the Unit maintain records of formal candidate complaints and their resolutions?

 

At Midwestern State University, student rights and responsibilities are specified in both undergraduate and graduate catalogs and on the University website. Student complaints can be registered at several levels including academic concerns, nonacademic concerns, and student discipline. MSU has published guidelines outlining the protocol to be followed when resolving these complaints. Some of these protocols are quite simple, and others are more formal and have specific steps that must be followed by all of the parties involved in order to ensure due process. For instance, if a student complaint indicates an alleged violation of MSU’s Code of Student Conduct by the complainant or another member of the student body, the procedures to follow and student rights are specified in the Student Handbook. WCoE has a policy on formal candidate complaints as a part of its policy manual.The Unit follows Institutional policy on grievances.

Flowchart on Complaints

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2b.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the Unit's data collection, analysis, and evaluation may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

2c. Use of Data for Program Improvement

 

2c.1. In what ways does the Unit regularly and systematically use data to evaluate the efficacy of and initiate changes to its courses, programs, and clinical experiences?

 

The Unit designates one day each year as a data analysis day, when faculty review and analyze data from previous semesters. This includes all state level certification data, impact on student learning data, field experience, employer and graduate satisfaction surveys, and other formative information.

 

Several major changes have occurred in clinical experience over the last three years. First, the field experience for initial certification has been expanded to fourteen weeks, which is generally split into two separate placements providing candidates a more diverse experience. University supervisors now receive subject specific guides to assist them in determining the extent to which candidates are meetings the expectations of specialized program areas. In addition, since fall of 2009, university supervisors have received training in the online assessment system used to complete and submit the field experience observation form. Previously, university supervisors completed a hand written copy of the form that was submitted to the certification office. This often resulted in lost data, preventing an accurate analysis of program effectiveness.

 

One of the major changes to WCoE’s initial teacher certification program and Professional Block 2 came in changing from Planning and Assessment to the Teaching Methods courses.Data from students suggested a need for greater focus in teaching methods for mathematics.This resulted in a curriculum reorganization that now includes courses specifically aligned with Teaching Methods in Math, Science, and Social Studies.Also, Block 2 TWS data prompted greater emphasis on meeting the needs of individual students.

 

A review of midterm and final examinations in the Foundations of Special Education block in previous semesters demonstrated students’ difficulty with legislation and case law, such as discriminating between the requirements of various laws, and identifying how case laws impacted special education.As a result, the program established the Law Project in which students write about the legislation and case laws reviewed in five courses of their program. The special education program administers the Special Education Content Knowledge Exam (SECKE) during the last semester of the program.This assessment demonstrated that the students did not have an adequate knowledge of the theoretical perspectives of behavior disorders and of the assessment process for early childhood special education.This resulted in adding emphasis to both areas in three classes: Affective Disorders, Assessment, and Early Childhood Special Education.Faculty also developed new class activities to address the deficient areas.

 

The Educational Leadership program was restructured to meet the NCATE standards. In order to evaluate and improve the program, regional superintendents were surveyed, better informed, and communication and collaboration with the Unit was improved. In order to make better programmatic and curricular decisions, the online assessment system was adapted to track Candidate performance and progress at regular points in the program. Members of the Educational Leadership faculty now meet with area principals and superintendents annually to solicit advice and offer Unit support. Program decisions are now influenced by course evaluations. The greater need to collaborate has prompted an increase in departmental meetings and greater collegiality.

 

The unit recently added a field experience data base to ensure that all candidates have field placements in diverse settings. Each candidate, prior to student teaching is required to document where their placement occurred, the grade level, and experiences with diverse students. Student teachers are asked to complete an evaluation of their experiences in student teaching regarding their perceptions of their cooperating teacher and university supervisor. The data gathered from this is used by the unit to evaluate future placements of teachers in school setting and continued use of existing field experience supervisors.

 

Analysis of student teacher questionnaire data and input from principals on professional development campuses led to moving the classroom management class to much earlier in the professional sequence.

 

Feedback from the field and students resulted in requiring Exceptional Individuals course for all secondary students.

 

Excet/TExES testing results revealed weaknesses in several secondary content programs. In response, practice tests were purchased for all content areas to be used as a diagnostic instrument, particularly for post baccalaureate students.

Data revealed that students entered the second block in the professional sequence before completing core requirements, resulting in prerequisites being placed and enforced on these courses.

 

Needs assessments from area superintendents, principals, and curriculum specialists led to the addition of programs and degrees (e.g. superintendency, bilingual education, educational technology, master math teacher, master reading teacher, and dyslexia).

 

Needs assessments from regional superintendents and principals resulted in multiple grant applications aimed at teacher recruitment and the Closing the Gapsefforts of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). 

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2c.2. What data-driven changes have occurred over the past three years?

 

WCoE adopted the TWS to measure candidate Impact on Student Learning. Early candidate performance data from this measure prompted the integration of specific elements of the TWS (e.g. contextual factors) into the teacher preparation curriculum. Assignments, activities, and assessment of these elements of the TWS were subsequently developed and implemented throughout the teacher preparation curriculum.

 

THECB currently requires that all degree programs in Texas move toward the 120-hour minimum required by SACS.WCoE’s EC-4 certification plan had been 131 hours. In condensing to 120, WCoE made the decision to eliminate the Human Diversity course by parsing out the identified standards and required assessments into 4 different courses. The Unit reviews these data each semester to insure the delivery and monitoring of these important standards.

 

In February 2008, a special education graduate course developed a research presentation on what it would take to provide a transition to college program for high-functioning students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).Approval was gained for seeking funds, a house was dedicated to this purpose, and networking ensued with the Autism Network. Review of data and input led to the implementation of a small program in Fall 2008, serving 3 students.The success of these students and support by the Texas Legislature led to an expansion of the program to 6 students, one of whom has transitioned from the residential setting to a regular dorm.

 

Creation of a database for graduate programs containing information about degree plans and courses completed for each student has allowed departments to plan two-year schedules of course delivery to facilitate timely completion of the Unit’s 12 Master’s degree programs.

 

In analyzing the success rate in math courses, the high failure, “D”, and withdrawal rates in required courses resulted in the Unit’s hiring of tutors who would attend classes, take notes, conduct study sessions, and help candidates plan for exams.

 

WCoE’s Educational Leadership program at the building and district level was completely revamped two years ago. The courses, prior to that time, were only partially aligned to SPA standards, and no assessment data were being collected. Currently, all courses have at least one assessment aligned to ELCC SPA standards, and faculty members provide analysis and recommend changes based upon data retrieved from the system. The internship requirement for this advanced level program was redesigned to identify specific outcome expectations for candidates. The adjustments allowed some flexibility in the activity, but still require Candidates to meet core standards.

 

WCoE’s graduate Educational Technology program has existed for only three years. For the first two cohorts, only four of the technology courses required an electronic portfolio. The Educational Technology department plans to require one continuing electronic portfolio for the entire sequence of required courses for the next cohort. The portfolio reflects learning activities in each required course and original work to reflect the various standards. Based upon analysis of lessons, the Educational Technology faculty observed that over 35% of Candidates had a tendency to focus too much on specific technology and software skills and terms rather than on subject matter skills when designing and delivering lessons integrating technology. Part of this tendency was because of the technology application TEKS [Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills] where the focus is often on obsolete technology. The department now requires more instances in which candidates plan, implement, and assess activities and lessons involving the integration of technology where the primary focus is on content.

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2c.3. What access do faculty members have to candidate assessment data and/or data systems?

 

Faculty members are granted access to data through several different avenues. Access to data depends upon the type of data and location of the assessment. Each faculty member, both at the initial and advanced level, individually collects assessment data through the online assessment system and, as a result, processes their own data analysis. Data from key assessments that are collected through course work or field experiences are distributed to the faculty as a whole at faculty meetings. This data includes assessments of impact on student learning, state certification exam, field experience observations, and student teacher evaluations. The state certification exams are divided into subject exams and professional pedagogy and responsibility exams. All candidate assessment data retrieved from the state data base is downloaded into a common storage drive to which certain administrators and assistants have access. The restriction is based upon confidentiality requirements. However, candidate performance on these exams, without identification, is downloaded and distributed to the appropriate faculty twice per year. WCoE faculty members receive candidate performance data on the teaching exam, while members of the Teacher Education Committee, representing the content areas, receive data on subject area exams.

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2c.4. How are assessment data shared with candidates, faculty, and other stakeholders to help them reflect on and improve their performance and programs?

 

All candidates receive a copy of the rubric for most of the key assessments prior to completing the assignment. Some assessments (e.g. the Teacher Work Sample) provide open-ended responses from faculty and further explanation to inform reflection. The Teacher Work Sample assessment in Field Experience and the mini-Teacher Work Sample for lesson planning include specific sections for reflection by the candidate.

 

For the state certification exams, candidates are provided feedback through the state database system.

Candidates in Field Experience receive feedback six times per semester, three for each placement setting. Candidates in Field Experience have conferences with the university supervisor and cooperating teacher that and receive a written formal assessment. The candidate receives summative assessment from the university supervisor and cooperating teacher twice per semester, once for each placement.

 

Faculty members gather their own assessment data through the online assessment system and use it to inform efforts toward program and course improvement. Faculty members receive course evaluations after each semester for their own analysis and for inclusion in their annual performance review. The annual performance review requires faculty members to interpret evaluations and explain how data informs performance improvement. Once per year, faculty members disaggregate and analyze program assessment data. Program changes and improvements emerge from reflection and faculty discourse related to this analysis.All program reports and data from every type of assessment are made available on a common database for the unit.

 

Each program has a stakeholder advisory group that receives feedback on candidate performance. In addition, the Teacher Education Committee receives annual reports about candidate performance. The data is disseminated in its entirety and in individual program reports to the chair and faculty of content area departments across campus.

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2c.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the use of data for program improvement may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

Optional

 

1. What does your Unit do particularly well related to Standard 2?

 

Overall, during the last couple of years, WCoE and its programs have adopted the use of technology in the generation and collection of candidate performance data in lieu of paper and pencil assessment. For example, within an 18 month time period, the faculty transitioned from scoring key assessments like the Teacher Work Sample (impact on student learning) with paper rubrics where data was manually entered one record at a time by a single individual to the current, automated paperless system. Faculty members continue to modify assessment strategies to meet their needs with the goal of creating a more seamless, systematic data collection and analysis system. The WCoE faculty continues to make adjustments to rubrics and assessment format to make the process more practical for candidates and the data more useful to faculty. That the value and use of the various assessments are subjects of regular review and critique reveals a growing awareness and understanding of the evolving role of assessment in education.

 

WCoE continues to develop new types of assessment and identify areas of improvement for its operations. In the last semester, content and grade specific program evaluation surveys were developed and/or modified to measure candidates’ perceptions of the program during field experience. A new survey was also created to measure candidates’ perceptions of experiences with cooperating teachers and university supervisors. WCoE will share this data with participating school districts in its effort to inform and promote their active involvement in the selection of cooperating teachers. Though WCoE has been satisfied with most of its university supervisors in the past, the new assessment tool will provide data that can be used to improve their selection and training. 

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2. What research related to Standard 2 is being conducted by the Unit or its faculty?

 

Coe, M. A. (2006 - Longitudinal study, completion date December, 2010). Candidates’ level of technology use for TWS. Since the start of the use of Teacher Work Sample at Midwestern State University, the researcher has collected data from the Design for Instruction component of the TWS, specifically the use of technology.

 

Capps, M.A (in press). Assessment in Education. In J. Muffo (Ed.) Handbook forInstitutional Research. Association for Institutional Research.

 

Capps, M.A., Simpson, G, Owen, J., Schreiber, J, Gore, M., Dixon, L & Graves, E. (2010). Virtual Assessment of Pre-Service Teacher Dispositions. Paper presented at the American Association for Colleges of Teacher Education 62nd Annual Meeting and Exhibits. Atlanta, GA.

 

Redmon, R.J., Mullen, G. & Schreiber, J. (2008). Candidates’ and cooperating teachers’ perceptions: Student teaching and the Teacher Work Sample. Paper Presented at Southwest Education Research Association’sAnnual Meeting at New Orleans, Louisiana, February, 2008.

 

Redmon, R.J. (2009). Teacher work sample: Significant, challenging learning goals and valid assessment? Paper presented at the 16th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum at Arlington, VA, October 2, 2009.

 

Redmon, R. J. (2009). The Teacher Work Sample as a Catalyst for Change.Paper presented at the 61st Annual Meeting of the American Association for Colleges of Teacher Education to be held at Chicago, Illinois, February 6-9, 2009. Describes the impact of the TWS onteacher preparation curriculum and assessment and on the student teaching experience.

 

Redmon, R. J. (2008). What Great Teachers Do: Perceptions of Practicing Teachers and Pre-Service Teacher Candidates. Paper presented at the 15th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, October 10, 2008, Austin, TX.

 

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STANDARD 3. FIELD EXPERIENCES AND CLINICAL PRACTICE

 

The Unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practice so that teacher candidates and other school professionals develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.

 

3a. Collaboration between Unit and School Partners

 

3a.1. Who are the Unit's partners in the design, delivery, and evaluation of the Unit's field and clinical experiences?

 

WCoE considers collaboration with its partners a vital component of its initial teacher preparation program.MSU collaborates with its EC-12 partners through advisory councils, Teacher Education Committees, shared professional development, the mentor office coordinator, school district personnel, and the WCoE certification officer in the design, delivery, and evaluation of field and clinical experiences.

 

The Teacher Education Committeeoversees admission to the WCoE and student teaching and considers and recommends curricular changes within the program.Membership is comprised of all college Deans and Department Chairs directly associated with teacher preparation, the WCoE certification officer, a community representative, a public school representative, an Education Service Center representative and the committee is chaired by the WCoE Dean.

 

Initial teacher candidates participate in a variety of field and clinical experiences in local and regional school districts under the guidance of WCoE faculty supervisors and teacher mentors. Initial candidates complete three semester long internships and a 14 week student teaching experience in EC-12 public school classrooms.

 

MSU maintains a collaborative relationship with several independent school districtsin the area including Wichita Falls Independent School Districtand Burkburnett ISD.WCoE has an agreementwith several designated Professional Development Schools in Wichita County.Professional Development Schools provide a living laboratory for candidates to practice and hone their pedagogical skills. The WFISD mentor coordinatorworks as a liaison between school district administrators and WCoE faculty and the certification officer to identify mentor teachers and provide the best possible field experience for teacher candidates. Licensed, practicing mentor teachers act as partners in the professional development of WFISD teacher candidates. In addition, all advanced programs benefit from advisory councils and partnerships with local and regional school districts; Regions 9and 11, distance learning sites, and other community agenciesthat serve adolescents and children.

 

Advanced programs have field placements in the Wichita Falls Independent School District as well as the smaller rural districts surrounding Wichita Falls. Advanced candidates in educational leadership participate in field experience at their home campuses but also make visits to campuses/districts that represent different backgrounds than their own. Advanced candidates in school counseling participate in field experience through a practicum course conducted at the candidate’s home campus as well as the state hospital and area support organizations.  

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3a.2. In what ways have the Unit's partners contributed to the design, delivery, and evaluation of the Unit's field and clinical experiences?

 

Input regarding the design, delivery, and evaluation of the Unit’s field and clinical experiences is obtained through a variety of sources and is used to assess and improve the effectiveness of the WCoE’s field and clinical experiences. The main source of collaboration is the Teacher Education Committee, which meets a minimum of four times a year to evaluate the program, recommend curricular changes, and establish policies and procedures related to program design and theplacement of initial teacher candidates in clinical and field experiences.

 

Another source of feedback is the collaboration between the WFISD Mentor Officeand the WCoE certification office.In the spring of 2002, WCoE, along with WFISD, established the district mentor officeto provide training and support for cooperating teachers that supervised WCoE student teachers. Each field-based professor works as the site coordinator for their PDS campus and serves as a liaison between the school campus and WCoE. Site coordinators meet with campus teachers, administrators, and specialized school faculty to coordinate grade level and certification area placements, arrange teaching schedules, organize tutoring clinics, observe and evaluate intern progress, participate in staff meetings and other school related functions, and offer professional development and training.

 

Once every other year employersof recent WCoE teacher certification graduates and alumniare asked to complete program evaluation surveys to help determine the strengths and weaknesses of the WCOE initial and advanced programs. The results are analyzed by WCoE faculty, the advisory council, and the Teacher Education Committee to help make decisions about the design and delivery of field experience and clinical practice.

 

In addition, advisory councils and field supervisors work closely with advanced programs in Counseling, Educational Leadership, Reading, and Special Education to review course and assessment data, recommend curricular changes, offer expertise and training, provide program input, and inform the design of field experiences to meet the needs of schools and candidates during field experience or clinical practice.

 

For example, the stakeholder committee for Special Education recommended an increase in the candidates’ caseload for Special Education Practicum (SPED 6943) and suggested that candidates perform full and individual assessments. At the suggestion of field supervisors, the counseling department introduced a new course Special Graduate Topics in Counseling (COUN 6953) for substance abuse issues and professional orientation for school counselors.

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys

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3a.3. What are the roles of the Unit and its school partners in determining how and where candidates are placed for field experiences, student teaching, and internships?

 

The WCoE certification office works closely with the WFISD Mentor Office and surrounding school districts and administrative personnel to coordinate candidate diverse placements for field experiences, student teaching and internships. The WCoE certification office serves as a liaison to coordinate all initial teacher candidates’ placements in Wichita County and the surrounding areas.The certification office works with human resource staff, the principal, assistant principal, and the mentor office to provide field experiences in the professional education block courses and student teaching. The partners ensure that candidates receive a wide range of experience working in diverse locations with diverse populations and a variety of grade levels related to their certification area.

 

WCoE site coordinators, teaching professional block courses, and tutoring/reading clinic university supervisors, are responsible for arranging placements for their assigned campus by working collaboratively with the Mentor Office (WFISD only) or district administrators, campus principal and vice principal, reading specialists, school counselors, parents, and campus teachers as it pertains to program requirements. Placements are a collaborative decision based on teacher availability, certification program area, mentor teacher experience, and candidate needs. Mentors must be appropriately licensed teachers with Texas certification and have an interest and desire to mentor a student intern. The mentor and WCoE site-coordinator work closely to evaluate the progress of the student intern.

 

Individual practicum and internship placements for advanced candidates in Counseling, Educational Leadership, Reading, and Special Education are determined collaboratively by WCoE faculty and school districts/community agencies to ensure that candidates receive a diverse field or practicum experience. Advanced Educational Leadership candidates seeking principal or superintendent certification work closely with local and regional school district principals, superintendents, and WCoE Educational Leadership professors to decide placement of internships.

 

Special Education and Diagnostician advanced candidate placements are coordinated among the district’s special education director, principal, course professor, and graduate student.

 

Advanced Reading candidate literacy coaching placements are a joint decision involving the course professor, local and regional school district principals, and the candidate.

 

Advanced Counseling Internships are decided by area school districts and course professors. Placement in community agencies are decided by the director and course professor. 

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3a.4. How do the Unit and its school partners share expertise and resources to support candidates' learning in field experiences and clinical practice?

 

The WCoE and its school partners share expertise and resources through participation on advisory committees. WCoE school and community partners often serve as instructors, consultants, and guest speakersfor key courses in initial teacher preparation and advanced programs.

 

Expertise is also shared during modeled lessons by field experience supervisors and cooperating teachers, at school faculty meetings, and during teacher planning times. WCoE faculty members provide professional developmentto our school partners through workshops/professional development, professional conferences (TAIR, STEPH, mentor training, and in-service meetings).Field-based courses offer initial teacher candidates opportunities to participate in parent conferences, professional learning communities, campus committees, standardized testing, curriculum planning, and education-related family and community events under the guidance of their field supervisor, cooperating teacher, or university professor. Field-based courses offer candidates opportunities to see teachers plan, deliver, and assess instruction. WCoE resources such as lap-top computers, digital cameras, projectors are shared with classroom teachers in the PDSs. Educational Leadership, School Counseling, and Special Education advanced programs provide courses to various districts via distance learning sitesthroughout Regions 9 and 11. Region 9and 11share facilities for distance learning and also offer professional development to initial and advanced candidates. Region 9 personnel offer WCoE educational leadership students training in College and Career Readiness Standardsand C-Scopeand provided a C-Scope overview to WCoE faculty. Educational Leadership faculty train WFISD faculty in RTI. Administrators from area schools, in turn, share expertise with leadership candidates. Counseling students have an opportunity to meet professionals from the community and the schools and to discuss counseling issues with their future colleagues. Counseling faculty members serve on the boards of First Stepand Rose Street Day Treatment and Therapeutic School, which allows them to support and share resources with these community agencies. Advanced Reading candidates in the Literacy Coaching Practicum provide in-service presentations and demonstrations for local and regional district professionals. Summer reading clinics for area children are provided by candidates enrolled in READ 6283 and in SPED 5813. 

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3a.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to collaboration between Unit and school partners may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

3b. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Field Experiences and Clinical Practice

 

3b.1. What are the entry and exit requirements for clinical practice?

 

Entry and exit requirements for clinical practice are outlined in the 2010-2012 Undergraduate and Graduate catalogs.

 

Entry Requirements for Initial Programs: For initial teacher certification programs, candidates must make applicationfor student teaching by Oct 1 for the spring semester and by February 15 for the fall semester. Candidates applying for student teaching must have met the following criteria:

 

1. 2.6 GPA in professional education with no less than a “C” in any course

2. 2.6 GPA (minimum) in all courses in the teaching field(s) with no less than a “C” in any course: (Students enrolled in majors in the Prothro Yeager College of Humanities and Social Sciences must have a minimum of 2.75 in the content area courses and no less than a “C” in any course)

3. 35 hours of field experience, with at 26 hours at the appropriate teaching level before student teaching begins.

4. Pass the Speech/language Diagnostic Assessment (during EDUC 2013). If remediation or correction is required, speech/language therapy is provided for candidates as a professional service and must be successfully completed prior to student teaching.

5. Complete the application to student teaching and submitted it to the certification office.

6. Have been approved by the Teacher Education Committee.

7. Have attended the Student Teacher Information meeting.

 

Exit requirements for Initial Programs: For initial programs, each candidate must demonstrate effective planning, teaching and communication skills in the following ways:

 

1. Complete the 14 week student teaching experience.

2. Complete a Teacher Work Samplewith a score of 3 or 2.

3. Earn a grade of “C” or better on the Student Teacher Evaluation Report. (The Student Teacher Handbookprovides a detailed explanation of the student teaching grading process.)

4. Complete a poster presentation at the Education Career Fair.

5. Complete the resume writing experience at the Career Management Center.

 

Entry and Exit Requirements for Advanced Programs and Other School Professionals:

Requirement for advanced certification and/or other school professional are program specific and are delineated in individual practicum and/or internship courses associated with a graduate program. Program advisor/coordinators work with advanced candidates on eligibility. The candidate must meet Institution requirements, West College of Education requirementsp. 80, and specific program requirementsbefore they are eligible for clinical practice. The Advanced Programs Entry and Exit Requirements for Clinical Practice Summarydetails the specific entry and exit requirements for clinical practice for Counseling, Educational Leadership, Reading, and Special Education.

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3b.2. What field experiences are required for each program or categories of programs (e.g., secondary) at both the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels, including graduate programs for licensed teachers and other school professionals? What clinical practice is required for each program or categories of programs in initial teacher preparation programs and programs for the preparation of other school professionals? Please complete Table 7 or upload your own table at Prompt 3b.9 below.

 

Table 7

Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program

 

 

Program

 

Field Experiences

Clinical Practice (Student Teaching or Internship)

Total Number of Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

3b.3. How does the Unit systematically ensure that candidates develop proficiencies outlined in the Unit's conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards through field and clinical experiences in initial and advanced preparation programs?

 

“Let Knowledge Open Doors” is WCoE’s motto and the organizing concept for Conceptual Framework.To meet this guiding principle, the Unit strives for both the candidates and the faculty to attain, model, and continuously improve on the Unit’s 11 stated goals.

 

Each WCoE initial and advanced teaching program is designed to “prepare successful, reflective professionals through the use of best practices,” core elements of the WCoE Conceptual Framework.

Each program is built upon a broad general education core; depth in content subject matter; practical, field based professional education courses; and a meaningful student teaching experience that prepares candidates to be both competent and reflective practitioners. The Alignment Matrix of Unit, State, and Professional Standardsdetails how each conceptual framework performance outcome is linked to the knowledge and skills defined by the Texas Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities Standards. Initial teacher candidates in the WCoE are required to complete a variety of field experiences in schools, tutoring clinics, and community agencies prior to student teaching to help them grow as effective teachers as detailed in the Field Experience by Course Tables: EC-6, 4-8,8-12. Course syllabi illustrate the alignment of each course to the conceptual framework, state, and professional standards.

 

Initial teacher candidates complete a series of field experiences in field based professional block coursesand tutoring clinics prior to their student teaching, providing intense, cohesive, and diverse opportunities to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of the Unit’s Conceptual Framework, state standards as shown in these documents: Professional Blocks Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities Field Experience Alignment and professional standards for each program. The Student Teacher Evaluation Report is used by university supervisors and cooperating teachers to evaluate the candidates performance during student teaching. The Student Teacher Evaluation Reportreflects state standardsand has been linked to the professional standards for each program as indicated in the each program.

 

In programs for advanced teacher candidates and other school professionals, all field experience and clinical practice is linked to the professional and state standards and the WCoE’s conceptual framework. Further documentation of candidates’ proficiencies appears in the SPA Common Assessment No. 3 for each program. For example, the Clinical Case Study Report Rubric, READ 6283 Portfolio,Web Assessment Plan, Superintendent Plan, Counseling Behavior Rubric, and Dyslexia Clinical Observationsensure that candidates develop proficiencies outlined in the Unit’s conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards through field and clinical experiences in the Reading, Educational Leadership, School Counseling, and Special Education advanced programs. The Advanced Programs Alignment: State Standards, Professional Standards, and Conceptual Framework Overviewprovides a detailed overview of how each advanced program ensures alignment with professional and state standardsreflected in the conceptual framework.

 

Link to Professional Block Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities Field Experience Alignment

Block 1

Block 2

Block 3

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3b.4. How does the Unit systematically ensure that candidates use technology as an instructional tool during field experiences and clinical practice?

 

WCoE faculty members model the use of technology as an instructional tool in their courses. In addition, all initial teaching candidates receive advanced training in the use of technology as an instructional tool in Computer Applications for Education(EDUC 1023). This course provides candidates experience organizing and manipulating data with computers, including hands-on experience with word-processing, databases, spreadsheets, graphics, desktop publishing, and graphing. EDUC 1023 focuses on computer applications for the classroom including hardware and software selection, computer environments, telecommunications, and ethics.

 

Candidates use various forms of educational technology in the professional block courses. Laptop carts are available at each PDS to be used during field experiences. These computers are shared with PDS teachers and students and assist candidates during lesson preparation and implementation. Technology as an instructional tool is addressed in some way in each of the professional block courses.

 

The Teacher Work Sample requirement during student teaching requires candidates to integrate technology in ways that make a significant contribution to student learning. The TWS Analysis Report for fall 2008-spring 2010 provides assessment information related to candidates’ application of technology integration. In addition the online assessment system (TK20) allows students to develop and maintain an electronic portfolio of their work in field-based courses. (see SPA Reports for evidence and links below for non-SPAs)

 

Special education candidates are taught how to use board makers for nonverbal children and tutorial computer programs in Strategies courses (SPED 3313 and 4513).

 

All candidates seeking advanced degrees are required to use technology as an instructional tool during clinical practice and during their action research project. Technology is integrated into the field experiences and clinical experiences of Educational Leadership candidates through data analysis, communication, curriculum development, project planning, budgeting, and assessment. Advanced Reading candidates use technology tools, such as PowerPoint software, to mentor and coach in-service teachers in the teaching of reading during the Literacy Coaching Practicum (READ 6303). Presentation software is used to generate discussion; provide information; and demonstrate concepts and literacy strategies, such as digital story creation, that in-service teachers can implement into their literacy instruction. Advanced candidates in Counseling utilize taping equipment for counseling sessions. Clinic rooms are equipped with cameras, recorders, and TVs so the faculty supervisor can observe sessions and record feedback for the student counselor. When students review tapes, comments by the faculty supervisor are heard as voice-overs.

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Art

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Music

Exhibit 1c.2 Teacher Work Sample Theatre

 

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3b.5. What criteria are used in the selection of school-based clinical faculty? How are the criteria implemented? What evidence suggests that school-based clinical faculty members are accomplished school professionals?

 

The selection process is a collaborative effort among the WCoE certification office, school systems, and school district administration. School-based clinical faculty who serve as cooperating teachers for initial candidates during student teaching must hold a current Texas teaching certificate, must have a minimum of 2 years teaching experience in the appropriate content area, and be recommended by the school principal. In practice, Cooperating teachersworking with WCoE candidates have at least 7 years of teaching experience, but most have more than15 years teaching experience. University supervisorsare teachers or administrators with advanced degrees and many years of teaching experience.

 

Candidates evaluate the effectiveness of their cooperating teachers and university supervisor in the following areas: Preparation for the Student Teacher, Observations, Planning for Teaching, Conferences, Teaching, Evaluation, Classroom Management and Discipline, and Personal and Professional Relations with Teacher Candidate by completing a Student Teacher Evaluation of Cooperating Teachers and university supervisors. The Student Teacher Evaluation of Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors Aggregated Results Report for Spring 2010suggests that the majority of initial teacher candidates are satisfied with the effectiveness of their cooperating teachers and university supervisors. In advanced programs, mentors for principal interns are practicing principals or assistant principals with Texas teaching and principal certificates. Mentors for the superintendency program hold current Texas Superintendent certification and are practicing superintendents in the districts where the candidates intern. Site supervisors for advanced counseling candidates must hold a master’s degree, school counselor certification, and have a minimum of 2 years professional experience. The majority of site supervisors are licensed professional counselors (L.P.C.’s). School based supervisors for advanced candidates in special education are certified practitioners such as the Director of Special Education and diagnosticians with a minimum of 2 years experience.

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3b.6. What preparation do school-based faculty members receive for their roles as clinical supervisors?

 

All school-based faculty members serving as cooperating teachers and university supervisors receive a Student Teacher Handbook, which outlines the policies, procedures, and expectations associated with student teaching. In addition to the handbook, all university supervisors receive Mentor Trainingfrom WCoE prior to beginning their supervisory roles. This training includes information about the Student Teacher Evaluation Report, which is an assessment that measures student teacher performance.

 

University supervisors and mentor teachers are also given a Reference Guide for Observing and Assessing Student Teachers.Mentor teachers in the WFISD are also required to participate in a mentor training through the WFISD Mentor Office before teacher candidates are placed in their classrooms. University supervisors also meet with cooperating teachers to discuss the policies, procedures, and expectations outlined in the Student Teacher Handbook in the beginning of each student teacher placements. In advanced programs, Educational leadership mentors are invited to a Mentor Dinnerat which information about the internship program and their role in it is shared.Additional information is provided to them by the internship professor and by the intern. At least one on-site personal visit with the mentor is made by the internship professor.. School-based supervisors for advanced counseling students regularly consult with practicum faculty at the practicum site and via phone conferences. Supervisors and candidates review the Practicum Handbook, Informed Consent Formsand the Evaluation Feedback Form.Practicum faculty for advanced Special Education candidates oversee field experiences and monitor the relationship between the site-based supervisor and the candidate in community agencies and school district programs serving children, adolescents, and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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3b.7. What evidence demonstrates that clinical faculty members provide regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs, and other school professionals?

 

The Student Teacher Handbookprovides a detailed explanation of evaluation procedures, guidelines for student teacher conferences, and the roles of university supervisors and cooperating teachers. Cooperating teachers and university supervisors monitor and evaluate the performance of candidates throughout the semester. University supervisors formally observe, advise, and evaluate candidates a minimum of six times during the 14 weeks of student teaching. Cooperating teachers meet with student teachers to project a long range plan for gradual increase of classroom responsibilities and teaching and meet weekly to evaluate progress toward program objectives. Using the Student Teacher Evaluation Report, the university supervisor, candidate, and cooperating teacher together use a three-step evaluation process mid-way through student teaching to identify areas of strength and areas where improvement is needed.

 

Candidates are asked to rate their supervisors’ ability to provide continuous and feedback and evaluation consistently throughout the student teaching experience. Results can be seen at The Student Teacher Evaluation of Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors Report.

 

Clinical faculty members who supervise advanced candidates in School Counseling, Educational Leadership, Reading, and Special Education provide regular and continuous support through weekly meetings, conferences, phone conferences, discussion boards, journals, logs, modeling, lessons, counseling sessions, oral and written feedback, and collaborative projects. Advanced candidates in Applied Research (EDUC 6753)meet weekly with the course professor who oversees the research design and completion of a formal written report of original empirical research (file paper) in their area of study. The Feedback and Support for Clinical Practice: Advanced Programs chartdetails the specific feedback and support plans for each advanced program.

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3b.8. What structured activities involving the analysis of data and current research are required in programs for other school professionals?

 

Advanced candidates seeking a master’s degree complete a graduate research file paper, which is a formal demonstration of scholarship and culmination of the candidate’s learning experience. Advanced candidates take two research courses, an introductory research courseand an applied research course. During the courses, candidates learn the role of research in education and become acquainted with research methodologies appropriate to education. They learn to understand, analyze, synthesize, and critically evaluate contemporary educational research.

 

In the Principal Internship for Educational Leadership, candidates conduct a School Improvement Projectbased on analysis of data in the field placement school. Assignments in several courses begin with analysis of data in order to create plan of improvement. These include the Comprehensive Curriculum Assessment(EDLE 5583), Diversity Analysis(EDLE 5653), School Climate Assessment(EDLE 5673), and Team Project: Strategic Plan(EDLE 5686).

 

Each course in the Superintendency program involves the analysis of data (including AEIS data, financial data, etc.) to be used in completing projects, developing strategic plans, and creating budgets. An annual field trip to the Budget Boot Campis an opportunity to learn the data analysis required to build a budget.

 

Candidates enrolled in the Reading Master’s program are involved in the analysis of data and current research through completion of a Language Acquisition Research Paperduring the Language Acquisition and Development course (EDUC 5843). This assessment allows for inquiry learning on a topic of the student’s choice and enhances the candidate’s familiarity with professional journals and with research sources and procedures.

Advanced Counseling candidates learn how to collect data to demonstrate the effectiveness of counseling programs during Professional Orientation to School Counseling.

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3b.9. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the design, implementation, and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

3c. Candidates’ Development and Demonstration of Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions to Help All Students Learn

 

3c.1. On average, how many candidates are eligible for clinical practice each semester or year? What percent, on average, complete clinical practice successfully?

 

The Student Teacher Applicant and Completer Tabledetails the number of student teacher applicants and completion rates for spring, 2008, through fall, 2009.As indicated in the table, the WCoE averages approximately 66 student teacher applicants per semester with a 99% completion rate, which results, in part, from constant monitoring by WCoE faculty and staff.From the time candidates enter the WCoE initial teacher certification program, they work with their advisors and the certification office to insure that they meet student teacher entrance requirementsbefore they start the application process. The Graduate Completers by Major Tabledetails the number of advanced candidate completers by major from fall 2008 to fall 09.

 

The Reading Program Applicants and Completerstable indicates that three candidates were enrolled in Reading Clinical Practicum (READ 6283) in the summer of 2009. All three candidates successfully completed clinical practice for a percentage of 100% successful completion.

 

Ten to twenty students are eligible for School Counseling Practicum each semester. Between 2007-2009, 100% completed the 200 required hours. The completion rate is high because candidates who do not meet minimum skill standards in Theories and Techniques are allowed to repeat the course until skills are developed.

 

Five to ten students are eligible for Special Education Practicum each semester. All students completed the required 90 hours and the full contingent of assessments from 2008-2009.

 

The Principalship Clinical Practice Applicants and Completers Tableshows that 100% of applicants in the program completed the program successfully in the past two years. The principal clinical practice averaged 8-10 candidates per semester for the past 2 years. The Superintendency program Applicants and Completers Tableindicates the average enrollment in the superintendency program is 5 candidates, all of which successfully completed clinical practice.

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3c.2. What are the roles of candidates, university supervisors, and school-based faculty in assessing candidate performance and reviewing the results during clinical practice?

 

The roles of student teachers, university supervisors, and cooperating teachers are explained in the Student Teacher Handbook. As outlined in the student teacher handbook, the student teacher’s roles and responsibilities are divided into three areas: planning instruction and a TWS; developing professional relationships with cooperating teachers, university supervisors and students; and engaging in professional conduct. Cooperating teachers help candidates grow professionally and gain competence and help candidates meet the objectives of student teaching by providing advice and regular feedback to the student teacher and the university supervisor. The university supervisor serves as a liaison among the university, the candidate, and school district educators and administrators and ensures that candidates and cooperating teachers are communicating with each other.

 

In addition to providing feedback and support, university supervisors and cooperating teachers assess the performance of candidates enrolled in student teaching using a three-step evaluation process at the midpoint and end of the student teaching experience. The Student Teaching Evaluation Reportprovides a measure of the candidate’s progress and performance and is jointly completed and reviewed by the candidate, the cooperating teacher, and the university supervisor.

 

Clinical faculty members who supervise advanced candidates in the Reading Clinical Practicum (READ 6283) provide feedback on lesson plans and reflections and periodically observe candidates. Supervisors provide either immediate feedback during tutoring or delayed feedback based on field notes from the tutoring experience. Similarly, during the Literacy Coaching practicum (READ 6303), candidates provide peer support and receive peer feedback through class discussions of practicum experiences. The instructor provides feedback during class discussions and on candidates’ written lesson plans and reflections from practicum sessions. Instructors also provide feedback from direct observation of candidates’ practicum experience based on field notes taken during the practicum sessions.

 

Advanced candidates in educational leadership complete a Standards-based Self-Assessmentand discuss it with their school-based mentors and university supervisors in EDLE 5693. Mentors and university supervisors also complete a standards-based assessment of each candidate.

 

On-site supervision for practicum students in School Counseling is the responsibility of the master’s level field supervisor. The Practicum Handbookincludes an evaluation form that is reviewed in class the first week of the semester. University practicum supervisors (teaching faculty) encourage candidates to discuss the evaluative criteria with on-site supervisors during initial supervisory meetings so both supervisors and candidates agree on what will be evaluated. University practicum supervisors complete on-site visits several times a semester to talk with both site supervisors and candidates and to observe client sessions. At the end of the semester, the site supervisor completes the evaluation form, offers feedback to the student, and discusses student’s performance with the university faculty. Candidates also review their progress with the university supervisor in an exit meeting.

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3c.3. How is time for reflection and feedback from peers and clinical faculty incorporated into field experiences and clinical practice?

 

A three step evaluation process involving candidates enrolled in student teaching, university supervisors, and cooperating teachers provides valuable information regarding the candidate’s performance during clinical practice.The university supervisor and cooperating teacher provide continual oral and written feedback to the student teacher throughout student teaching. The Student Teacher Observation Recordprovides feedback to the student teacher six times during the semester.

 

The first conference is used to outline areas of strength as well as areas where improvement is needed.This conference is also used to set goals and to address issues and concerns. The final evaluation conference is used to discuss the overall student teaching experience.The candidate completes a Final Evaluation Form, which reflects his/her estimate of strengths as well as areas for improvement.The university supervisor and cooperating teacher jointly evaluate the candidate’s performance and also complete a Student Teaching Evaluation Report.A three-way conference is held to discuss the final evaluation forms and to address any problems and concerns. Candidates enrolled in student teaching also meet twice during the semester to reflect and receive feedback from peers and WCoE faculty. During these meetings, candidates review and discuss their Teacher Work Samples (Student Teaching Orientation) and discuss their overall student teacher experience and related issues.

 

Advanced candidates have many opportunities to reflect daily on field experiences/clinical practice and to receive oral and written feedback from clinical faculty and peers. Class or web-based discussions and reflection are built into every field experience activity. In addition, candidates provide peer feedback when working as partners during tutoring sessions.

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3c.4. What data from multiple assessments provide evidence that candidates demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn in field experiences and clinical practice?

 

Initial teacher candidates in the professional block courses are required to demonstrate knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn by planning and delivering lessons during field experience placements in local public schools. Each initial candidate is required to teach a total of ten lessons, which are assessed by their mentor teacher or university professor using the Field Experience Lesson Observation Forms for Blocks II & III. The Portfolioassessment in professional Block 3 and the Mini TWS Assessmentin professional Block 2 allow students to demonstrate knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions related to helping all students learn. Additional evidence of knowledge and skills linked to field experience can be found in the TExES Standard’s Alignment Matrices for initial Teacher Certification Programs, which links the required knowledge and skills of the Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities and Content Proficiencies to each course.

 

Initial teacher candidates are assessed during student teaching using the Student Teacher Evaluation Report. The evaluation form is designed to provide a formative and summative evaluation of candidates based upon four clusters: Planning for Learner-Centered Instruction; A Classroom Environment that promotes Equity, Excellence, and Learning; Instruction and Communication; and Professionalism. The student teacher evaluation form is aligned to the standards of each major SPA. A detailed analysis of findings of the Student Teacher Evaluation Reportcan be found in each SPA Field Experience Assessment Report. The Student Teacher Final Evaluation Report Results details the results of the summative assessments conducted by cooperating teachers and university supervisors for fall 2008 to spring 2009.

 

The Teacher Work Sample(TWS) also provides a measure of content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and effect on student learning. Professional dispositions for all teacher candidates are assessed at specific points as candidates progress through the program.The Pre-Philosophy Paper, Block II Dispositions Assessment, Field Experience Disposition Observation, and Graduate Employer Surveysare used to assess the professional dispositions of candidates. The Advanced Program Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions Summaryexplains how each program ensures that candidates develop the necessary knowledge, skills, and dispositions for their specific field.

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3c.5. What process is used to ensure that candidates collect and analyze data on student learning, reflect on those data, and improve student learning during clinical practice?

 

All initial candidates complete a Teacher Work Sample . The TWS is a record of the candidates’ ability to carefully consider all contextual factors that influence instruction and to then use those factors to plan and design a Unit of instruction, including an assessment plan that can demonstrate changes in student knowledge, skills, or dispositions resulting from instruction. The teacher candidates provide credible evidence of their ability to facilitate learning and determine student performance. The TWS serves as an impact on student learning with 7 sections. Specifically, the Analysis of Student Learning requires candidates to use assessment data to profile student learning and communicate information about student progress and achievement.

 

Advanced Certification Programs: During clinical practice in EDLE, principalship candidates complete a School Improvement Projectbased on data analysis. As one internship activity, candidates also lead a project to increase students’ academic skills or enhance teaching based on data on student learning. As part of course requirements, advanced reading candidates demonstrate the process of collecting and analyzing data in order to improve student learning. In sum, reading candidates demonstrate the ability to collect and analyze assessment data, and to reflect on that data in order to improve student learning.

 

Candidates in the Master’s in Special Education Dyslexia program demonstrate their ability to collect information about student abilities and make decisions through a one hour video session where candidates are scored on procedure and technical skills.

 

Candidates in the Master’s in Curriculum & Instruction collect and analyze student data while conducting an action research project. The action research project tests the effect of some learning theory, curriculum change, or teaching strategy with the purpose of improving student learning. The resulting research report (file paper) is scored using college and departmental criteria for relevance, content, organization, and manuscript style (APA). The project and report are successfully completed when the candidate’s 3 member graduate faculty committee agrees unanimously that all standards have been met.

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3c.6. How does the Unit ensure that all candidates have field experiences or clinical practice that includes students with exceptionalities and students from diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic, gender, and socioeconomic groups?

 

Initial certification candidates are required to participate in an introductory course with field experience. These placements are coordinated with the Wichita Falls Independent School District and provide each candidate an experience at three levels of K-12 school settings.

 

Candidates serve 30 + hours of field experience occur during each of the second and third blocks of professional education coursesThe courses are taught through Professional Development Schools in the Wichita Falls ISD and Burkburnett ISD. The schools are selected to maximize candidate exposure to diverse populations and learning contexts. Candidates are required to prepare a formal written report on their individual experiences. This data is collected through TK20 each semester and is disaggregated by course. In the spring of 2011, candidates will begin completing diversity forms that indicate their individual experiences. The data from these will be compiled and analyzed for required experience. (see evidence in diversity section Table 9)

 

The WCoE certification office, PDS site coordinators, university faculty, school district administrators and personnel, and community agencies work together to provide a wide range of field experiences and clinical practice for initial and advanced candidates in teacher preparation programs and programs for other school professionals. To ensure diversity of placements, decisions are based on the following criteria: previous field experience placements, number of field experience placements, setting/geographic location (e.g. school districts, community agencies, rural/urban/suburban, classroom, tutoring clinics,), students/clients (e.g. gender, socioeconomic status, ethnic/racial difference, ELL, students with exceptionalities), and licensure.

 

The Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) performance reports for Region 9and Region 11(2008-2009) provide evidence of the diversity in our field experiences and clinical practice by providing extensive information on the programs and demographics of the Unit’s school district partners throughout regions 9 and 11. In addition, the unit creates a yearly report on cooperating sites used by our student teachers

 

Candidates seeking principal certification complete a field experience activity in Building School Communities for Diverse Learners (EDLE 5653) and design a Back-to-School program for delivery to diverse constituents in the community. The Reading Clinical Practicum (READ 6283), includes a clinical tutoring component in which candidates work with children from various diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic, gender, and socioeconomic groups. Advanced Special Education candidates are required to complete a series of field experiences and one practicum (minimum of 130 hours) working with individuals with exceptionalities in schools and community agencies throughout Region 9.

3c.6 Yearly Diversity Report on Student Teacher Cooperating Sites

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3c.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the development and demonstration of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

Optional

 

1. What does your Unit do particularly well related to Standard 3?

 

The WCoE is particularly strong in the area of student teacher support, supervision, and evaluation. The WCoE Student Teacher Handbook details a well defined procedure for ensuring that student teachers receive continuous support and feedback from WCoE faculty, university supervisors, and cooperating teachers. The WCoE certification office is dedicated to developing a strong relationship with many area campus administrators, teachers, and specialized support staff. The joint creation of the WFISD Mentor Office illustrates the dedication that WCoE has to its Unit partners and teacher candidates to ensure a quality field and clinical experience for all.

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2. What research related to Standard 3 is being conducted by the Unit or its faculty?

 

 

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STANDARD 4. DIVERSITY

 

The Unit designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum and provides experiences for candidates to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates can demonstrate and apply proficiencies related to diversity. Experiences provided for candidates include working with diverse populations, including higher education and P-12 school faculty; candidates; and students in P-12 schools.

 

[In this section the Unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting

differences when they exist.]

 

4a. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Curriculum and Experiences

 

4a.1. What proficiencies related to diversity are candidates expected to develop and demonstrate?

 

As stated in the unit’s Conceptual Framework, the WCoE is resolute in its commitment to the preparation of culturally proficient educators in an increasingly diverse environment. The WCoE Vision statement “envisions a community of learners whose enhanced knowledge opens doors for all people.” Furthermore, the WCoE philosophical statement articulates the belief “that learning changes both the individual and society. Developing resiliency and tolerance enhances an individual’s potential. Individuals with a cause beyond self contribute to an informed, democratic and synergistic society. We will establish a reflective and collaborative community to enhance the potential of both the learner and society.” This philosophical statement provides direction for all preparation programs residing in the WCoE. All preparation programs are committed to addressing and integrating diversity into the culture and instructional activities of the Unit.

 

Further evidence of the WCoE focus on diversity is manifest in the following unit goals, which are aligned with professional and state standards.

1. Learning Environment- create challenging, supportive, and learner centered environments in diverse settings.

2. Individual Development- demonstrate knowledge of individual differences in growth and

development.

3. Diverse Learners- recognize the value and challenges of individual differences.

4. Strategies and Methods- use a variety of instructional strategies aligned with content to actively engage diverse learning.

 

The goal of diverse learners is further delineated in the knowledge, skills and dispositions expected of all candidates in initial and advanced programs:

 

Knowledge: WCoE candidates demonstrate an understanding of the impact of race, ethnicity,

disability, gender, and social class on the learning process of children in school and home situations. In addition, graduates demonstrate knowledge of the impact these societal differences bring to the classroom

 

Skills: WCoE candidates are able to plan lessons, modify teaching, adjust assignments, and monitor their approach to the classroom to accommodate differences in racial, ethnic, disability, gender, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Candidates not only accommodate these differences, they celebrate them by incorporating the backgrounds of their students into the learning process of the classroom.

Dispositions: WCoE candidates appreciate the contributions made by differing ethnic, racial, disability, gender, and socioeconomic backgrounds of their students and the families from which they come.

 

The unit values and calls on all candidates to practice reflection and self-assessment as they progress through their undergraduate and/or graduate program. All programs include core classes, elective classes, field experiences, clinical practice, student teaching and/or internship experiences, as well as participation in other educational and social activities as members of the larger university community.

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4a.2. What required coursework and experiences enable teacher candidates and candidates for other school professional roles to develop:

 

lawareness of the importance of diversity in teaching and learning; and

lthe knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to adapt instruction and/or services for diverse populations, including linguistically and culturally diverse students and students with exceptionalities?

 

The WCoE commitment to diversity is evident in course syllabi, instructional activities and a variety of field experiences candidates participate in as they progress through their chosen preparation program. For example, at the undergraduate level, these Human Diversity issues are addressed in core courses- EDUC 2013, EDUC 3153, EDED 3173, EDUC 4106/4113, Reading 3103, Read 4203/4213, Read 4223, and SPED 3613 (see Exhibit 4a.2 Human Diversity Standards)

 

1. Students learn to respond appropriately to diverse needs in shaping the campus culture.

2. Students communicate and work effectively with diverse groups in the school community to

ensure that all students have an equal opportunity for educational success.

3. Students develop a vision of learning that promotes success of all students based on relevant

knowledge and theories, including but not limited to an understanding of the diversity of learners

and learner needs, and school as interactive, social and cultural systems.

4. Students develop an awareness of learning differences, multicultural awareness, gender sensitivity

and ethnic appreciation in the campus community.

5. Students learn how to respond to diverse sociological, linguistic, cultural and other factors that

may affect the students’ development and learning.

6. Students become aware of the importance of upholding professional standards of tolerance and

dedication to a multicultural, pluralistic perspective so all students can achieve their potential.

7. Students learn how to apply concern for diversity in the learning process.

 

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Most core courses, field experiences, and clinical practice take place in public school classrooms. Courses prescribe a range of observation tasks and both small/large group teaching activities. Instructions present research-based instructional strategies appropriate for diverse classrooms. Candidates are required to complete observation reports wherein they describe the diverse nature of students and make inferences regarding the implications of the observed differences and the way the mentor teachers respond to them.

 

1. Classroom Management techniques are discussed with emphasis on motivation, high expectations, and positive relationships.

2. EDUC 2013 class investigates beliefs towards diversity by looking at ethnic, cultural, economic and ableness issues. Students become aware of the importance of data-driven decision-making and the importance of designing programs advantageous to diverse populations.

3. READ 4213 students complete a thematic unit: “Diversity In The Classroom.” The Exceptional Individuals Class in Block I focuses on disability diversity.

4. READ 4223 students must consider children’s diverse sociological, linguistic, cultural, and economic factors that affect children’s development.

 

5. SPED 3613 and ECED 3173 are required courses for those enrolled in the undergraduate teacher preparation programs. In SPED 3613, students are required to obtain and utilize a wheelchair for movement around campus for a day. Following this experience, they record their thoughts in a written reflection.

 

6. The Teacher Work Sample, required of all undergraduate students in the preparation program, is structured in such a way that diversity issues present in the classroom must be identified, analyzed, and addressed in the lesson planning process.

 

At the advanced program level, diversity is addressed through coursework alignment with national, state and professional standards for each program.

 

1. In the graduate Counseling program and the Educational Leadership program, self analysis and

understanding are integrated within the coursework. The Educational Leadership program employs

the Life Styles Inventory to provide students with insight about who they are. Similarly, The

Counseling Program utilizes the Meyers Briggs Type Indicator to lead students to important self-

discovery.

2. COUN 6013 engages graduate students in Counseling programs with individuals from diverse

ethnic and cultural groups to build skills essential to multicultural counseling.

3. EDLE 5653 includes a project which requires Ed Leadership students to (a) identify an ethnically

diverse public school district (b) complete a demographic analysis of the district and community

(c) identify the academic needs of the resident student groups and (d) develop a plan which

establishes goals to address the learning needs of the various diverse student groups.

 

Texas certification requires that candidates be prepared in 17 areas, including linguistic, cultural, and exceptional differences. A course correlation matrix can be found at

Exhibit 4a.2 PPR Course Correlation

Exhibit 4a.2 Human Diversity Standards

4a.3. What key assessments provide evidence about candidates' proficiencies related to diversity? How are candidates performing on these assessments?

 

Candidates are first assessed on disposition towards diversity from the conceptual framework as part of their pre-philosophy assignment in the Introduction to School and Society course. This assignment is an assessment of candidates dispositions towards all eleven learning goals identified in the conceptual framework. However, they are scored on each individual goal.

 

Candidates are again assessed on Unit Assessment #3 (lesson planning) through the mini Teacher Work Sample in Block 2 (EDUC 4202/EDUC4113). This assignment, among other things, measures students’ knowledge of diversity as a factor in lesson planning as well as their skill in designing lessons based upon the diverse background of their students. In addition, during this course, candidates have their first opportunity to teach a lesson in a classroom in one of the professional development schools. Faculty who teach these courses evaluate candidate disposition towards each of the learning goals identified in the conceptual framework, including specifically the disposition towards diversity.

 

The TWS (SPA #5) assesses candidate knowledge of diversity as a factor in designing instruction reflecting the diverse background of their students. Candidate knowledge of diversity as a factor in teaching through the is also measured by the Student Teacher Evaluation (SPA #4). Specifically, this key assessment measures the candidates’ knowledge of students (Cluster 1, Part B).

 

Candidates beliefs regarding each of the Unit’s eleven learning goals, in particular the disposition towards diversity, are evaluated by university supervisors during the student teaching experience.

 

Follow-up survey data with employers serve as the fourth measure of knowledge, skills, and dispositions towards eleven goals identified in the Conceptual Framework. Every other year a survey is sent to potential employers of WCoE graduates requesting their participation in assessing graduate knowledge, skills, and dispositions. One of the dispositions addressed by the follow-up survey is diversity.

 

See SPA assessments #3 (lesson planning), #4 (student teacher evaluation), #5 (Teacher Work Sample)

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Alumni Surveys 

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Employer Surveys 

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Advanced Surveys 

Exhibit 1a.4 Table of Teacher Preparation Surveys 

 

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4a.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to diversity proficiencies and assessments may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

4b. Experiences Working with Diverse Faculty

 

4b.1. What opportunities do candidates (including candidates at off-campus sites and/or in distance learning or alternate route programs) have to interact with higher education and/or school-based faculty from diverse groups?

 

All candidates in the undergraduate and advanced programs have multiple opportunities to interact with faculty representing various ethnic and cultural groups by virtue of being a member of the MSU community. All candidates in initial and advanced programs interact with faculty from diverse backgrounds in a multitude of ways including; ethnicity, language, gender, abilities and experiences.

 

As the only state designated liberal arts institution, initial candidates must successfully complete a mandated curriculum and enroll in various courses outside of the college of education. A heavy emphasis on field experiences and internships for all candidates necessitates interaction with school-based teachers and administrators. The candidates interact with the school based teachers, who represent a diverse background as well. The unit places candidates in diverse school based settings throughout the Wichita Falls Independent School District and Burkburnett, a small rural district north of Wichita Falls.

 

WCoE has experienced some success in recruiting a diverse faculty representing several ethnic and cultural groups. Table 8 details faculty demographics. The unit takes pride in being the most diverse faculty of all the colleges on the MSU Campus. In addition, the student population both within the college and across the university represents a diverse background; 36% of the student population represents non-White ethnic backgrounds.

 

4b.1 Evidence Link Table 8 Faculty Demographics. 

 

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4b.2. What knowledge and experiences do faculty have related to preparing candidates to work with students from diverse groups?

 

The overwhelming majority of professors in the WCoE worked in the public school setting for many years. These settings varied from urban to suburban to rural districts, as well as experiences outside of the U.S., extending, in one case, to Taiwan. Three faculty members have considerable experience working as bilingual teachers and teaching English Language Learners. Another professor is certified in Federal Court as an expert in multicultural issues. Another professor offers extensive experience as a campus principal on a Navajo Reservation. Professors in the unit have served on campus intervention teams established by the Texas Education Agency to address unacceptable academic performance issues with struggling school campuses. Such intervention teams provide direction to school personnel to bolster graduation rates, minimize/eliminate dropouts and narrow the achievement gaps prevalent among various racial/ethnic, low socioeconomic, disabled, and English Language Learners.

 

Professors in WCoE have partnered with the University of North Texas, Vernon College, and North Central Texas College to secure a multimillion dollar grant for the purpose of addressing critical needs in the recruitment, preparation, and retention of new teachers in the surrounding urban/rural school districts.

 

A U.S. Department of Education Grant was secured as a bilingual teacher training program. Candidates are recruited, supported, and trained as Bilingual/ESL teachers to meet the educational needs of a growing English Language Learner population. The WCoE is a trailblazer in establishing an Autism Support Program for candidates motivated to pursue a higher education. The program has gained national notoriety for actively recruiting autistic students and providing them with the necessary support critical to academic and social success. Many faculty members have participated in training with diverse students.

 

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4b.3. How diverse are the faculty members who work with education candidates? [Diversity characteristics in addition to those in Table 8 can also be presented and/or discussed, if data are available, in response to other prompts for this element.] Please complete Table 8 or upload your own table at Prompt 4b.5 below.

 

Table 8

Faculty Demographics

 

 

 

Prof. Ed. Faculty Who Teach Only in Initial Teacher Preparation Programs

n (%)

 

Prof. Ed. Faculty Who Teach Only in Advanced Programs

n (%)

Prof. Ed. Faculty Who Teach in Both Initial Teacher

Preparation & Advanced

Programs

n (%)

 

All Faculty in the Institution

n (%)

 

 

 

School- based faculty

n (%)

American Indian or Alaska Native

0(0%)

1(4%)

1(4%)

5 (1.4%)

0(0%)

Asian

0(0%)

0 (0%)

1(4%)

7 (2.0%)

0(0%)

Black or African American, non-

Hispanic

0(0%)

2(8%)

0

7 (2.0%)

0(0%)

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific

Islander

0(0%)

0(0%)

0(0%)

0(0%)

0(0%)

Hispanic or Latino

1(4%)

0

2 (8%)

16 (4.6%)

0(0%)

White, non-Hispanic

7 (27%)

5(19%)

6 (23%)

303 (87.3%)

0(0%)

Two or more races

0

0

0

0

0(0%)

Other

0

0

0

9 (2.6%)

0(0%)

Race/ethnicity unknown

0

0

0

0

0(0%)

Total

8(31%)

8(31%)

10(38%)

347 (100%) 

 

Female

6(23%)

7 (27%)

6(23%)

168 (48.4%) 

 

Male

2(8%)

1(4%)

4(15%)

179 (51.6%) 

 

Total

8(31%)

8(31%)

10(38%)

347 (100%) 

 

 

4b.4. What efforts does the Unit make to recruit and retain a diverse faculty?

 

The unit is committed to recruiting and retaining diverse faculty as it is to recruiting and retaining highly qualified and experience faculty. When a vacancy occurs, the position vacancy is advertised locally and nationally in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

In 2004, the MSU Board of Regents approved a comprehensive Recruitment/EEO Plan with specific policy directions to the administration regarding equal employment opportunities for all individuals. The plan states, in part: “It is the policy of this university to not just comply fully with all state and federal laws and relevant court decisions regarding equal employment opportunity, but to take proactive steps to recruit, employ, and retain qualified individuals from traditionally underutilized groups in both faculty and staff positions. This recruitment plan is intended to serve as a guide for supervisors, managers, and other university administrators to assist them in achieving this goal.” The President of the university is responsible for the monitoring of the recruitment plan and for the preparation of progress reports regarding the employment of individuals from traditionally underutilized groups. The Director of Human Resources/EEO/Title IX Officer is given the authority to administer and ensure compliance with the recruitment plan. The recruitment plan seeks to maximize the recruitment of individuals from traditionally underutilized groups. The established plan employs various means to rack and document the recruitment efforts being made to employ diverse faculty. Job announcements are forwarded to organizations representing diverse groups are advertised in publications directed at underutilized groups.

 

As indicated previously, the WCoE has achieved a measure of success in the employment of faculty representing diverse groups. It is the most diverse faculty among all the colleges in the university.

 

4b4 Evidence Link: MSU Recruitment/EEO/Plan 

West College of Education Policy Manual 

 

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4b.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty diversity may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

4c. Experiences Working with Diverse Candidates

 

4c.1. What opportunities do candidates (including candidates at off-campus sites and/or in distance learning or alternate route programs) have to interact with candidates from diverse groups?

 

The size and structure of MSU provides multiple opportunities for candidates to have meaningful interaction with other candidates representing a variety of diverse groups. Continuous interaction takes place through required and elective courses, multiple field experiences, and clinical placements. Sizes of classes in the unit maximize the establishment and maintenance of positive relationships along all candidates: 36% of the student population represented backgrounds from non-White ethnic backgrounds. Other ethnic groups represented include Black Non-Hispanic, Hispanic, Asian, American Indian, Pacific Islander, Caribbean, and other non-identified groups.

 

Student organizations within the WCoE allow candidates to interact outside of the classroom environment. Such organizations as (a) Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) (b) Association for Childhood Education International (ASCEI) (c) Bilingual Education Student Organization (BESO) and (d) Kappa Delta Pi, honorary education society, are comprised of various diverse individuals. These organizations meet regularly on campus but also are actively involved outside of the university with (a) Chapters from other universities, (b) volunteer their service in the larger community of Wichita Falls such as Habitat for Humanity, and (c) participate in regional, state, and national educational workshops and conferences. Additionally, over 100 student organizations are active on campus and represent diversity in many different forms: ethnic, racial, religious, political, and cultural. Candidates are constantly provided with a cafeteria of student activities in which they can participate and acquire new knowledge and understanding.

MSU also has an active Office of Multicultural Services. The primary focus of this service is to establish and promote awareness, education, and respect within and outside of the university community. Various workshops are provided for students which serve to enlighten students regarding cultural conflict, current issues in diversity, racial tolerance, and the history of particular ethnic and or cultural groups.

 

The Office of International Servicesat MSU recruits, advises, and supports students from other countries pursuing a college education. Students from over 400 countries are enrolled in the university. Several are undergraduate and graduate students in the Unit and bring a rich, distinct perspective to the classroom and to other students.

Office of Multicultural Student Organizations 

Shades of Color Newsletter 

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4c.2. How diverse are the candidates in initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation programs? [Diversity characteristics in addition to those in Table 9 can also be presented and discussed, if data are available, in other prompts of this element.] Please complete Table 9 or upload your own table at Prompt 4c.4 below.

 

Table 9

Candidate Demographics

 

 

Candidates in Initial Teacher Preparation

Programs

n (%)

Candidates in Advanced Preparation Programs

n (%)

 

All Students in the Institution

n (%)

Diversity of Geographical Area Served by Institution

(%)

American Indian or Alaska Native

8(1%)

1(.4%)

63(1%)

434(1.1%)

Asian or Hawaiian/Pacific Islander

 

6(.08%)

2(.08%)

212(3.3%)

590(1.6%)

Black or African American, non-

Hispanic

69(9.2%)

19(8%)

761(12%)

3702(9.6%)

Hispanic or Latino

61(8.1%)

18(7.6%)

565(8.9%)

8160(21.1%_

White, non-Hispanic

566(75.5%)

164(69.5%)

4027(63.5%)

25842(66.7%)

Two or more races

10(1.3%)

2(.08%)

82(8.2%)

 

Other

19(2.5%)

24(10.2%)

520(8.2%)

 

Race/ethnicity unknown

10(1.3%)

6(25.4%)

114(1.8%)

 

Total

749

236

6335(100%)

 

Female

523(69.8%)

190(80.5%)

3741(58%)

 

Male

226(30.2%)

46(19.5%)

2685(42%)

 

Total

749

236

6335(100%)

 

 

4c.3. What efforts does the Unit make to recruit and retain candidates from diverse groups?

 

MSU and WCoE work aggressively to identify, recruit, and enroll students from diverse groups. The following initiatives are ongoing activities carried out by the university admissions office. The Unit has an active participation in University Crossroads comprised of universities committed to the goal of helping first generation students to develop a college-going culture.

 

In addition the Unit maintains active involvement with the Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and sends invitations to underrepresented minority students for campus visits at events such as Mustang Rally.

 

The Unit also maintains a partnership with “Yes Prep” charter schools in Texas that work with first generation students in Houston and a collaboration with the Region 9 Educational Service Center, the College-One-On-One Program designed to assist students with college applications, program selection, and the Apply Texas Application.

 

Upward Bound Program identifies low socio economic and underrepresented populations of high school students. The students begin the program as sophomores in high school and continue until enrolled as college freshman. Academic, social, and personal support is provided as necessary to insure entrance into the university.

 

The acquisition of the Bilingual Education grant has allowed for the deployment of a Hispanic recruiter to identify, recruit and navigate Hispanic students through the college admission maze and has allowed for Project BOW High School Summer Camp, a one week summer camp experience for students who have an interest in preparing to be elementary bilingual education teachers.

 

Exhibit Link: First Time, First Year (Freshman) Admission 

Exhibit Link: Enrollment and Persistence 

Exhibit Link: Project BOW 

Exhibit Link: Upward Bound

Exhibit Link: International Students 

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4c.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to candidate diversity may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

4d. Experiences Working with Diverse Students in P-12 Schools

 

4d.1. How does the Unit ensure that candidates develop and practice knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions related to diversity during their field experiences and clinical practice?

 

The WCoE provides multiple opportunities for candidates in all programs to apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions critical to successful interactions with members of diverse groups. Candidates in the initial programs all have the benefit of structured field experiments early in their programs thus gaining experience in working with diverse groups of students. These field experiences take place in the Wichita Falls Independent School District at schools designated as professional development schools. These schools are selected because of the opportunities and challenges inherent in the diverse make-up of the student population. The field experiences include observations and small and large group teaching practice for the candidates. Each program has a required number of field experience hours. Initial and advanced program Clinical Practice/Student Teaching/Internship also require a prescribed number of hours interacting, observing, and applying new knowledge and skills. In every case, candidates are continuously called on to reflect, analyze, and integrate observations and experiences with course activities. This serves to prepare them for situations they will encounter as practicing teachers. Clinical placements at both the initial and advanced programs levels challenge candidates to assume responsibility for planning and implementing activities that address the needs of immediate context.

 

The advanced School Counseling program insures that candidates experience counseling situations with diverse individuals and groups.

 

The Educational Leadership Program requires each candidate to fulfill an internship requirement in which leadership, organization, and management skills are practiced in diverse settings with the diverse populations.

 

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4d.2. How diverse are the P-12 students in the settings in which candidates participate in field experiences and clinical practice? Please complete Table 10 or upload your own table at Prompt 4d.4 below. [Although NCATE encourages institutions to report the data available for each school used for clinical practice, Units may not have these data available by school. If the Unit uses more than 20 schools for clinical practice, school district data may be substituted for school data in the table below. In addition, data may be reported for other schools in which field experiences, but not clinical practice, occur. Please indicate where this is the case.]

 

Table 10

Demographics on Sites for Clinical Practice in Initial and Advanced Programs

 

 

 

 

Name

of

school

 

 

American

Indian or

Alaska 

Native

 

 

 

 

 

Asian

 

Black or

African

American,

non-

Hispanic

 

Native

Hawaiian

or Other

Pacific

Islander

 

 

 

Hispanic

or

Latino

 

 

 

White,

non-

Hispanic

 

 

Two

or

more

races

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

Race /

ethnicity

unknown

Students

receiving

free /

reduced

price

lunch

 

 

 

English

language

learners

 

 

 

Students

with

disabilities 

Alamo

6(1.4%)

7(1.6%)

49(11.1%)

 

251(56.8%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4d.3. How does the Unit ensure that candidates use feedback from peers and supervisors to reflect on their skills in working with students from diverse groups?

 

All candidates are matched with mentors in the initial and advanced programs. Throughout the field experience, the mentors, who are school-based and practicing educators, provide feedback, advice, and corrections as necessary. Professors, responsible for the delivery of core courses, visit classrooms and other settings where candidates are practicing and provide timely feedback. School-based mentors are periodically required to complete evaluative forms reporting the performance of the candidates to the faculty. The Teacher Work Sample activity is a rigorous activity that compels candidates to exhibit the knowledge and multiple skills necessary for the planning and delivery of an instructional activity. Inherent in the TWS is the candidate’s ability to identify the contextual factors germane to the classroom setting. Upon submission of the TWS, each candidate receives detailed feedback regarding the instructional activity. The feedback is provided by a team of professors employing a comprehensive grading process.

 

Throughout both initial and advanced programs, candidates are required to understand and employ the practice of reflection. It is through reflection that candidates interpret their actions, gain new/different insights regarding their work, realize the “fit” of the lesson with the predetermined goals, and generate implications continued development.

 

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4d.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the diversity of P-12 students in schools in which education candidates do their field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

Optional

 

1. What does your Unit do particularly well related to Standard 4?

 

The WCOE is acutely aware of the rapidly changing demographics in public schools. In Texas, the minority population now outnumbers the historically majority population. Texas’ future and economic well-being is closely tied to the educational success of diverse groups within the schools. The educational achievement of underrepresented ethnic groups, low socioeconomic groups, and other cultural groups has not been stellar. The faculty recognizes its responsibility to invite and embrace diversity. This is evidenced by the increasingly diverse make-up of the faculty. The faculty also recognizes the opportunities that exist in recruiting and retaining a diverse clientele. Faculty members are eager and motivated to gain new knowledge and skills that will benefit all the students we serve. The faculty models tolerance and acceptance in their daily interaction. Although not always in agreement, dialogue and respect relative to philosophical and pedagogical differences prevail and everyone recognizes that the journey toward cultural proficiency is perpetual.

 

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2. What research related to Standard 4 is being conducted by the Unit or its faculty?

 

 

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STANDARD 5. FACULTY QUALIFICATIONS,

PERFORMANCE, AND DEVELOPMENT

 

Faculty are qualified and model best professional practices in scholarship, service, and teaching, including the assessment of their own effectiveness as related to candidate performance; they also collaborate with colleagues in the disciplines and schools. The Unit systematically evaluates faculty performance and facilitates professional development.

 

[In this section the Unit must include the professional education faculty in (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]

 

5a. Qualified Faculty

 

5a.1. What are the qualifications of the full- and part-time professional education faculty (e.g., earned degrees, experience, and expertise)? Please complete Table 11 or upload your own table at Prompt 5a.5 below. [Professional Education Faculty information compiled by AIMS from earlier reports submitted for the national review of programs and updated by your institution (see Manage Faculty Information page in your AIMS workspace) can be imported into Table 11. For further guidance on completing this table, see the directions provided below (select link "click here") as well as in the Help document (click on "Help" in the upper right corner of your screen.]

 

 

 

 

 

5a.2. What expertise qualifies professional education faculty members who do not hold terminal degrees for their assignments?

 

All professional education faculty members who do not hold terminal degrees have advanced degrees related to the courses they teach and extensive, relevant professional experience in public schools and may also be in the process of completing a terminal degree.Of the three faculty members who do not hold a terminal degree, one is ABD in Reading Education and expected to complete degree requirements in 2010.This faculty member has extensive experience in public schools as an elementary reading teacher. One Assistant Professor in the Master’s of Special Education (Dyslexia) program does not hold a terminal degree, but has exceptional expertise, having completed advanced dyslexia training at Scottish Rite Hospital and holds Qualified Instructor certification from The Alliance National Registration Exam for Multisensory Structured Language Education.One faculty member in kinesiology, hired in Fall of 2009, will begin a doctoral program in 2010. All adjunct members employed by the unit who serve as university supervisors are retired public school teachers and administrators. All have advanced degrees and, at a minimum, are required to have extensive experience in the area for which they are supervising student teachers.

Exhibit 5a.2 University Supervisor Certificates 

Exhibit 5a.2 University Supervisor Profile DB 

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5a.3. How many of the school-based faculty members are licensed in the areas they teach or are supervising? How does the Unit ensure that school-based faculty members are adequately licensed?

 

School-based (clinical) faculty members must be licensed in the fields that they teach and have a minimum of two years teaching experience. The state minimum is three years, but when the Unit cannot retain teachers with three years experience, candidates are assigned to teachers with two years of experience.No candidate is assigned to a teacher with less than two years of experience.School-based Clinical Faculty members are nominated by their principals. The selection of the school faculty is then a joint responsibility of the school district and unit. All school-based faculty members that supervise in graduate programs must hold the appropriate certificate, be actively working in the area of certification and have appropriate experience. Graduate internship candidates must secure permission of the campus principal to participate in the program. With the exception of the supervisors of the very few candidates in areas geographically far-removed from a university, all Higher Education Clinical Faculty are licensed in the fields that they supervise, either in Texas or in another state. All Higher Education Clinical Faculty must have a Master’s degree in order to be employed.

Exhibit 5a.2 University Supervisor Certificates 

 

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5a.4. What contemporary professional experiences do higher education clinical faculty members have in school settings?

 

WCoE higher education faculty members have a wealth of contemporary professional experiences in school settings. The WCoE is a Center for Professional Development, so two of the three professional blocks in the initial certification Teacher Education Program are housed in public schools. WCoE teaches these courses in six elementary schools, one junior high, and one high school. In addition, WCoE faculty members often supervise student teachers, supervise field experiences outside the professional blocks, consult with public school teachers and administrators, and present in-service workshops for the ISDs.All WCoE faculty members who work in initial and advanced teacher certification programs have taught in the public schools at some point in their careers; newer full-time faculty have taught in public schools within the last five years.

 

see Table 11

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5a.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty qualifications may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

5b. Modeling Best Professional Practices in Teaching

 

5b.1. How does instruction by professional education faculty reflect the conceptual framework as well as current research and developments in the fields?

 

WCoE describes itself as a community of learners, and its conceptual framework is based upon the premise that knowledge opens doors, the belief that everyone can learn, and the ideal of lifelong learning. It argues that successful teaching is a synthesis of content and pedagogy, of experience and reflection, and of theory and practice. It contends that effective teachers are sensitive to the needs of students and skillful in matching instruction to the learner and the context. The conceptual framework values critical thinking and problem solving skills. WCoE believes that learning is the genesis of change and that learned people contribute in positive ways to the society within which they grow and thrive. Instruction by WCoE faculty reflects these beliefs and understandings in concrete and meaningful ways. WCoE faculty members are teaching scholars who have an in-depth understanding of the dynamics of teaching and learning and of the content they teach. They skillfully integrate what is known about their content fields, teaching, and learning in their own instructional practice. In addition, the knowledge, skills and dispositions of the conceptual framework learning goals are aligned to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, Specialized Program Area Standards, and INSTASC Standards

 

Faculty attend national and state conferences in their fields. These meetings assist faculty to stay current with research and development in their respective fields. When departments look to include or change curriculum, they often examine programs within the state and across the nation for guidance in development. This allows for continued growth in both the state and national arena.

 

Conceptual Framework

SBEC Standards

TExES Test Frameworks

Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills 

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5b.2. How do Unit faculty members encourage the development of reflection, critical thinking, problem solving, and professional dispositions?

 

WCoE integrates reflection, critical thinking, problem solving, and professional dispositions into every element of the candidate’s coursework and field experience. WCoE faculty members model these behaviors and dispositions for candidates in their charge and emphasize the value of their development. They also provide guidance and opportunities to practice these behaviors in both low and high stake environments.

 

Professional dispositions are emphasized, and the seeds of their development are set prior to the professional blocks in EDUC 2013(School and Society). During this course, candidates explore the nature of teaching related dispositions and write a paper describing their educational philosophy. During Block 1, candidates learn to value diversity, to understand the importance of building personal relationships and a positive learning environment, and the need for differentiation of instruction that address student’s individual needs.

 

In Blocks 2 and 3 and during student teaching, candidates practice critical thinking and problem solving as they design and deliver instruction in a systematic, purposeful manner. In each of these courses, candidates develop lessons and units of instruction. In student teaching, they complete the Impact on Student Learning project (TWS), which both develops and demonstrates their ability to solve problems and think critically by adapting instruction to their teaching context and reflecting on both the genesis and the result of their professional decisions and behaviors.

 

Advanced candidates participate in some combination of practicum, internship, and action research, all of which encourage the development of critical thinking, problem solving, and professional dispositions and allow their measurement.

Exhibit 5b Modeling Practice 

Exhibit 5b.3 Instructional Strategies and Assessment 

 

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5b.3. What types of instructional strategies and assessments do Unit faculty members model?

 

WCoE faculty members model a variety of strategies and assessments that reflect our conceptual framework. Instruction is student centered and active. It is often collaborative and regularly involves decision making, problem solving, and focused reflection.

 

Though faculty members recognize and accommodate individual differences, they also model mastery learning principals, and when candidates design instruction, meet with them individually to review their work and require them to make revision until they meet standards.

 

Faculty members model effective communication strategies through a range of media including personal narrative, exposition, lecture-discussion, technology enhanced discussion, online discussion forums, written narrative and exposition, and physical animation.

 

Faculty members demonstrate commitment to candidates’ learning and monitor and adjust instruction to ensure that learning occurs. Faculty members engage candidates in informal discussions and conduct formal surveys in an effort to discover and shape understandings and dispositions. They plan new ways to teach competencies when assessment demonstrates a need, such as changing the sequence of competencies in coursework, revising unit goals, or changing the method/strategy of content delivery. Throughout the program, faculty members make instructional decisions based upon valid and reliable forms of formative and summative assessment. Faculty members model the use of multiple assessments and all forms of assessment including both traditional paper and pencil assessment and alternative forms of assessment such as performance assessment, portfolio assessment, focused reflection, and reading response.All faculty members use the feedback from course evaluations to adjust instruction.

 

Faculty members model appropriate and effective use of technology in their approach to teaching. This includes the use of Internet resources such as online course management, online (library) databases, blogs and wikis, online video databases, online texts, I inquiry, and effective search strategies. They also model the use of presentation soft and hardware, word processors, spread sheets, hypertext, other technology that may be available to them and that might contribute to candidate learning.

Exhibit 5b Modeling Practice 

Exhibit 5b.3 Instructional Strategies and Assessment 

 

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5b.4. How do Unit faculty members incorporate the use of technology into instruction?

 

WCoE received $112, 590 in technology grants over the last decade and is committed to preparing candidates who infuse technology into instructional delivery. WCoE faculty members model the use of technology integration throughout coursework, field experiences, and clinical experiences.Faculty members regularly model appropriate and effective use of technology in their approach to teaching. This includes the use of Internet resources such as online course management, online (library) databases, blogs and wikis, online video databases, online texts, I inquiry, and effective search strategies. It also includes non computer based technology such as audio and video recording equipment and (in kinesiology) instruments to measure human performance and condition. They also model the use of presentation soft and hardware, word processors, spread sheets, hypertext, other technology that may be available to them and that might contribute to candidate learning.

 

Technology available to faculty members in classrooms on campus and in PDS classrooms typically includes an instructor computer, Internet access, DVD and VHS players, a document camera, and a LCD projector with screen. Some classrooms are also equipped with a “smart” board, various remotes, student response system (clickers), televisions, etc. Counseling faculty members use rooms equipped with one way mirrors and video and audio recording equipment when candidates practice counseling techniques and strategies. Technology courses are taught in the Unit’s dedicated computer lab, which is equipped with 25 stations and a full range of software used to support technology integration and multimedia courses.

 

WCoE faculty members and candidates use a wide range of online resources to prepare for instruction and candidates regularly access information and instruction from online resources and demonstrate proficiency in technology in the day to day course work. Many faculty members use online course management (Blackboard) to deliver and facilitate certain learning activities. Students enhance their knowledge and skills and demonstrate proficiency in its use whenever they log on to submit an assignment or use an embedded resource such as a discussion forum or chat room. Faculty members use technology to deliver content and facilitate learning such as proficiency in integrating instructional television, designing web pages, submitting assignments through online course management and assessment tools (Blackboard and TK20), negotiating and designing web quests and instructional power points, using the internet, multimedia, DVDs, document cameras and video clips in their teaching. Faculty members employ assistive technology in teaching and assessing students with disabilities.Faculty members engage students in virtual classroom activities and simulations.In some courses, candidates video record their teaching and then view and reflect upon their performance.

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5b.5. How do Unit faculty members systematically engage in self-assessment of their own teaching?

 

WCoE faculty members constitute a reflective community of learners who are constantly engaged in formal and informal professional inquiry with the goal of improving instruction and the success of candidates. Faculty members seek critique and advice from each other and from the candidates they teach. Individual faculty members make course changes based upon their courses’ formative and summative assessments as well as candidates’ evaluations of their courses. Candidates evaluate faculty and courses on forms that are distributed by someone other than the person who is being evaluated (another faculty member or a designated candidate). The following semester, department chairs provide the faculty with their previous semesters’ student evaluations, and faculty make appropriate course changes based upon the data.

 

All faculty members teaching professional track courses review candidates’ TExES scores each year, and faculty who use common assessments meet together at the beginning of the semester to review the outcomes of those assessments from the previous semester and make decisions related to curriculum and delivery. Both program and course changes result from the findings of the assessments.For example, Block I reviews the contextual factors of TWS, and Blocks 2 and 3 review goals, lesson design, and assessment portions of TWS.Block 3 reviews the results of their Thematic Unit. These reviews have resulted in a number of changes in coursework and methodology. Most notable are the changes resulting from the adoption of the TWS as a measure of both pedagogical skills and effect on student learning. The first change was the adoption of components of the TWS in block courses in an effort to improve candidate performance on the TExES exams, faculty members have integrated explicit exam preparation elements into most professional block courses.

 

Exit surveys of candidates are examined each semester by department chairs who report their findings to the faculty in each program.Though exit surveys do not address individual course work or instructors, program changes are sometimes based upon these findings. One example of a change resulting in part from the results of exit surveys was the addition of an introductory research course into several of the advanced programs.

Course Evaluations 

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5b.6. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty teaching may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

5c. Modeling Best Professional Practices in Scholarship

 

5c.1. What types of scholarly work are expected of faculty as part of the institution's and Unit's mission?

 

WCoE expectations for faculty scholarship are detailed in the WCoE Policy Manual and in the WCoE Promotion and Tenure criteria. Faculty members in the West College of Education are both specialists and generalists.As such, they are expected to demonstrate evidence of effective scholarship both within their area of specialization and in other disciplines. The collaborative nature of WCOE makes co-publishing not only acceptable but also highly desirable.

 

Scholarly work is broadly defined. Scholarly indicators include traditional publishing sources including both peer reviewed journals and books, delivering presentations, editing and reviewing publications, applying for grants, reviewing grant proposals, participating in professional associations and initiatives, developing courses,completing and maintaining specialized training, conducting action research, and participation in field-based activities as per written agreement between the university and the West Center for Professional Development of Teachers.

Exhibit 5c.1 WCOE Policy Manual 

Exhibit 5c.1 WCOE Tenure and Promotion Criteria 

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5c.2. In what types of scholarship activities are faculty members engaged? How is their scholarship related to teaching and learning? What percentage of the Unit's faculty is engaged in scholarship? (Review the definition of scholarship in the NCATE glossary.) [A table could be attached at Prompt 5c.3 below to show different scholarly activities in which faculty members are involved and the number involved in each activity.]

 

Scholarly work is broadly defined in WCoE, but includes traditional publishing sources, delivering presentations, editing and reviewing publications, applying for grants, reviewing grant proposals, participating in professional associations and initiatives, developing courses,completing and maintaining specialized training, conducting action research, and participating in field-based activities as per written agreementbetween the university and the Professional Development Schools. All (100%) of full time faculty are engaged in scholarship. Adjunct faculty members often collaborate with full time faculty members in that pursuit.

 

The collaborative nature of WCoE makes co-publishing not only acceptable but also highly desirable. Faculty vitae reveal that though WCoE faculty members engage in scholarly work independently, they also regularly collaborate with colleagues within and without WCoE.WCoE colleagues also collaborate by providing or collecting data, providing peer review, and helping with editing or proofreading.

 

WCoE faculty members engage in scholarship within their area of specialization and in other disciplines. Some scholarship is basic (descriptive) research related to pedagogy, instructional strategies, or professional dispositions and other is evaluative in nature; however, most is action research of some kind, designed not only to evaluate personal practice but to forward the state of the art in teaching. WCoE faculty members are regularly engaged in testing assumptions made about learning theory, instructional strategies, attitudes, and teaching related technologies.

 

WCoE is actively engaged in both formal and informal dialogues about the design and delivery of instructional programs in both professional education and P–12 schools and meet regularly to discuss a range of topics. For instance, faculty members in the Educational Leadership -Technology Department meet weekly to discuss standards and explore issues germane to its preparation programs; the Bilingual Education Faculty meet regularly to review its fledgling preparation program and to discuss possible revisions; various block course committees discuss lesson plan format and evaluation of interns in the field; meetings are held with PDS school principals to discuss student placements; and intern lesson delivery is reviewed with mentor teachers each semester. Course development through both formal and informal collegial dialogue is regular and common within the WCoE.

 

WCoE faculty members are involved in a wide range of scholarly activity. During the period 2007-2010, WCOE faculty members published 4 books, 3 chapters in books, 21 refereed journal articles, 134 refereed presentations, and 32 invited presentations. During the same period, WCOE faculty members applied for 16 grants, received 14 for a total of $ 3,771, 262. More detailed information can be found in faculty vitae.

Link to online faculty vita 

Link to Articles and Presentations 

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5c.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty scholarship may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

5d. Modeling Best Professional Practices in Service

 

5d.1. What types of service are expected of faculty as part of the institution's and the Unit's mission?

 

WCoE expects its faculty to be involved in service to the university, the profession, and the community. The WCoE policy manual and tenure and promotion manual explain these expectations in detail.

 

WCoE faculty members serve the university by serving on committees, boards, councils, and participating in university recruiting events. Though some are more involved than others, all WCoE faculty members serve.

 

WCoE faculty members participate in professional organizations, organize meetings and conferences, and by work with the local public schools to improve student learning and institutional effectiveness. In addition, faculty members are encouraged to serve on leadership boards in professional organizations.

 

Service to the university, to the profession, and to the community is integral to and defined by WCoE’s devotion to communities of learners. WCoE faculty members function as members of both local and extended communities of learners as leaders, participants, and as facilitators.

 

Faculty members are evaluated annually through the Annual Performance Report on these activities.

Exhibit 5c.1 WCOE Policy Manual 

Exhibit 5c.1 WCOE Tenure and Promotion Criteria 

Exhibit 5d.1 Annual Performance Report 

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5d.2. In what types of service activities are faculty members engaged? Provide examples of faculty service related to practice in P-12 schools and service to the profession at the local, state, national, and international levels (e.g., through professional associations). What percentage of the faculty is actively involved in these various types of service activities? [A table could be attached at Prompt 5d.3 below to show different service activities in which faculty members are involved and the number involved in each activity.]

 

As WCoE faculty members serve, they facilitate and model communities of learners when participating in scholarship and collegial activities with each other and with students. WCoE faculty attend TLRCactivities that include discussions related to design and delivery of instruction, provide training for TAs in Science Department, develop and teach segments of honors courses, andorganize the annual area TAIR reading conference. Faculty members have worked with WFISD to facilitate a Response to Intervention program on the 29 WFISD campuses for over 3 years. WCoE faculty members organize and manage the MSU Reading Center Tutoring Program. Faculty members participate in the university writing across the curriculum (WAC) initiative with professors across the university to improve student writing. Educational Leadership faculty established an advisory council comprised of practicing P-12 administrators. Bilingual Education Faculty members regularly collaborate with campus administrators and teachers who serve English Language Learners in WFISD.

 

As a member of American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), WCoE is proud to be a Unit American Democracy Project (ADP) school, integrating service learning into education classes.

WCoE faculty members provide leadership by serving as President-elect of Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), as Regional Director for Texas Council for Exceptional Children Division on Transition and Career Development, as the Wichita Falls Area TAIR (Texas Association for the Improvement of Reading) State Board Representative, as a member of the Friends of Academic Language Therapists Association Board, and by testifying to the Senate sub-committee regarding the upcoming state dyslexia licensing bill.

 

Faculty review proposals, organize sessions, and make presentations at national, regional, and state conferences, including Bilingual Education Association of the Metroplex, Texas Association for Bilingual Education, National Association for Bilingual Education, International Reading Association (IRA), American Education Research Association (AERA), Southwest Educational Research Association, and the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum. Faculty members also serve as members of editorial advisory boards for journals, reading consultants on both the local and national levels, and as reviewers of publications and conference proposals.

Exhibit 5d.2 Survey on Service 

 

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5d.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to faculty service may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

5e. Unit Evaluation of Professional Education Faculty Performance

 

5e.1. How are faculty evaluated? How regular, systematic, and comprehensive are the Unit evaluations of adjunct/part-time, tenured, and non-tenured faculty, as well as graduate teaching assistants?

 

The unit systematically conducts comprehensive evaluations of faculty, chairs, and deans.The evaluation system is designed to promote competence and intellectual vitality in teaching, scholarship, and service, and collaboration in each area.MSU’s Policy and Procedures Manual Section 3.114, Faculty Performance Review, notes all full-time faculty, both tenure-seeking and tenured, will be reviewed annually unless the faculty member is leaving during or at the end of the academic year.Chairs conduct the review of faculty, deans conduct the review of chairs, and the Provost conducts the review of deans.

 

The document that guides the Faculty Performance Review is the Faculty Member’s Annual Personal Report and Department Chair’s Evaluation.This document, which is completed by the faculty member, includes this written documentation: 

1. Teaching effectiveness (including collegiality in teaching);

2. Research and scholarly activity (including collegiality in research);

3. Service to the university, the profession, and the community (including collegiality in service);

4. Compliance with MSU Policies and Procedures. Course Evaluationscompleted by candidates are part

of the evidence required for teaching the Faculty Performance Review.

 

At the Annual Faculty Performance Review, each department chair meets with individual faculty to review the APR, and the meeting and results of the review are certified by signature.Faculty members have the right to appeal the results of their annual review within fifteen days of the contested review. Performance indicators are Meets Expectations, Needs Self-Improvement, or Needs Improvement with Supervision. A rating of Needs Improvement with Supervision in the area of teaching effectiveness or in two of the other areas requires a development plan co-written by the faculty member, the chair, and the dean. Graduate faculty members are expected to perform at an advanced level.

 

University tenure and promotion guidelines allow colleges and departments to make expectations contextually specific to their disciplines. In accordance, elements of the Tenure and Promotion Guidelines for West College of Educationemphasize instructional excellence and are explicitly aligned with its mission. 

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5e.2. How well do faculty perform on the Unit's evaluations? [A table summarizing faculty performance could be attached at Prompt 5e.4 below.) 

 

 Overall, Unit faculty performs satisfactorily with few exceptions. The faculty perform as well as or better than others when compared across campus. Faculty who apply for tenure and promotion make progress similar to all other colleges and departments on the campus.

 Exhibit 5e.2 Summary of Evaluations 

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5e.3. How are faculty evaluations used to improve teaching, scholarship, and service?

 

In the event that a faculty member’s annual evaluation identifies a minor deficiency in teaching, scholarship, or service, the faculty member and department chair collaborate informally to rectify the discrepancy so that the faculty member’s performance meets the criteria required by the department and the college. This is the case when the evaluation score is needs self-improvement or, in some cases, when the faculty member is found satisfactory, but could still benefit from some adjustment. The remediation may involve observation and critique, curricular or pedagogical adjustment, mentorship or collaboration with the department chair or other faculty member, or some combination of these things. If the score was needs self-improvement, he department chair may continue to monitor the remediation effort to insure it is working to resolve the deficiency.

 

Faculty who receive specific negative feedback on student evaluations may ask senior faculty to observe their classes and provide feedback.They may also observe veteran faculty and discuss the methods that such faculty employ in their efforts to improve.  

 

In the event of a more serious deficiency, one that receives a score of needs improvement with supervision and clearly places the faculty member outside of college and department performance expectations in the area of teaching effectiveness or in two of the other areas, a plan is developed collaboratively by the faculty member, the chair, and the dean. Remediation efforts are similar to those applied to less serious deficiencies, but the faculty member is closely mentored and monitored by the department chair (and possibly other faculty in the department) until the faculty member is found to have successfully resolved the deficiency.  

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5e.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the Unit's evaluation of professional education faculty may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.] 

 

5f. Unit Facilitation of Professional Development

 

5f.1. How is professional development related to needs identified in Unit evaluations of faculty? How does this occur?

 

The mission of WCoE, a community of learners, is to prepare successful, reflective professionals through the use of best practices.The explicit use of the term “community of learners” in the mission statement demonstrates that the unit’s core identity is centered on being continuous learners. It also defines WCoE’s collegial and collaborative approach to professional development in teaching, scholarship, and service.

 

The unit provides opportunities for faculty development in a variety of ways: regular formal faculty development inside the unit, regular formal faculty development for new faculty, regular informal faculty development, special formal faculty development for faculty needing assistance, regular formal faculty development at the university level, and regular formal faculty development outside the university.

 

One way that continuous learning is exemplified is through the use of weekly faculty meetings. WCoE classes are not scheduled on Fridays so meetings can be held each week. While faculty meetings include regular dissemination of housekeeping information, the primary function of faculty meetings is faculty development, including inquiry into our beliefs and practices as a unit.

 

Faculty members sometimes present their research at faculty meetings. The most recent presentations were research on learning communities and research on bilingual teachers in their induction years.The unit also invites researchers from outside the university to provide faculty development; a recent such presentation was on data-based decision making. All faculty members have the option of completing the Life Style Inventory from Human Synergistics and the Myers Briggs Type Indicator.

 

Senior faculty members seek out and invite new faculty to collaborate in research, enhancing the scholarly development of both.For example, such collaboration recently resulted in research on Teacher Work Samples, bilingual special education, and content area English literature.

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5f.2. What professional development activities are offered to faculty related to performance assessment, diversity, technology, emerging practices, and/or the Unit's conceptual framework?

 

The following assessment related professional development was conducted in recent faculty meetings:

1. Results of our field test and first virtual assessment and what those results might mean;

2. Results of student evaluations and how we might improve the programs;

3. Teacher Work Samples and various perspectives on their evaluation;

4. State certification test results and their implications for practice;

5. College readiness standards and what they mean to the unit

6. Data-based decision making (provide by an invited outside expert).

 

Educational technology faculty members recently provided professional development in the use of virtual assessment, blogs, wikis, and podcasting as teaching tools. Other faculty members recently presented research on learning communities and research on bilingual teachers in their induction years.WCoE also invites researchers from outside the university to provide faculty development; one such recent presentation was on data-based decision making.

 

WCoE helped develop the university’s Teaching & Learning Resource Center (TLRC). The purpose of the center is to improve the teaching skills of all university faculty.The TLRC provides regular faculty development events, and WCoE faculty members both attend and present at the events. In Spring 2010, the TLRC sponsored a diversity presentation and a review of the university-sponsored research for the year.WCoE faculty members have presented on mentoring, technology, student engagement in on-line classes, and student engagement in face-to-face classes.

 

The West Foundation has been generous in supporting the unit’s professional development for the past two decades. Support includes financial support for travel and conferences, as well as specific training, such as NCATE training and SPA writing workshops. Thanks to this support, WCoE faculty members are able to attend national and international conferences regularly.

 

WCoE faculty are both expected and encouraged to engage in personal and professional inquiry and reflection as a method of professional development. This often leads to formal research. To encourage and enhance professional development, senior faculty members and junior faculty members collaborate in research that enhances the development of both. Recent such collaboration resulted in research on Teacher Work Samples, bilingual special education, and content area English literature.  

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5f.3. How often does faculty participate in professional development activities both on and off campus? [Include adjunct/part-time, tenured, and non-tenured faculty, as well as graduate teaching assistants.]

 

Within the Unit, time is set aside for professional development at weekly faculty meetings, and these average 2 per month during the long semesters, resulting in an average 18 opportunities for professional development per academic year in this manner.

 

Outside the unit, WCoE faculty members attend 1 or more professional conferences and workshops per year. Faculty members also attend professional development provided by various campus offices and organizations. All WCoE faculty members (including part time and adjunct) and graduate assistants are eligible and encouraged to attend. Most faculty members attend TLRC professional development events, which are provided once or twice per long semester. The local chapter of the Texas Association of College Teachers (TACT) provides professional development opportunities monthly, one devoted to tenure and promotion, each year. Training related to avoidance of and response to workplace harassment and bias is offered by Office ofHuman Resources each semester, and all faculty are required to attend once every two years. Moffett Library offers 1 or 2 professional development opportunities yearly related to the availability and use of library resources, especially online databases. The Registrar’s Office offers multiple opportunities for faculty development in the use of the Banner student information system annually. A sample of professional development and research presentation can be seen at:

Exhibit 5f West Foundation Summary 

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5f.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the Unit's facilitation of professional development may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

Optional

 

1. What does your Unit do particularly well related to Standard 5?

 

 

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2. What research related to Standard 5 is being conducted by the Unit or its faculty?

 

 

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STANDARD 6. UNIT GOVERNANCE AND RESOURCES

 

The Unit has the leadership, authority, budget, personnel, facilities, and resources, including information technology resources, for the preparation of candidates to meet professional, state, and institutional standards.

 

[In this section the Unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]

 

6a. Unit Leadership and Authority

 

6a.1. How does the Unit manage or coordinate the planning, delivery, and operation of all programs at the institution for the preparation of educators?

 

The West College of Education is led by the Dean of the College.Department heads are in place to lead the three departments:

 

1. Counseling, Special Education, and Kinesiology (Dr. Michaelle Kitchen, chair).

2. Education and Reading(Dr. Ann Estrada, chair).

3. Educational Leadership and Technology(Dr. Jane Owen, chair).

 

A certification officer works with the programs, classes, and State of Texas certification system.Twenty-five full-time faculty members and 17 adjuncts deliver the curriculum.

 

The West College of Education participates in shared governance. The College meets regularly for strategic planning and to address current College business. These meetings are chaired by the Dean or his designee. Decisions resulting from general faculty meetings are submitted to the College Council made up of the Dean, Chairs, and Program Coordinators.Decisions are submitted to the University Academic Council and Provost for comment or approval. Certain decisions are also considered by the University Teacher Education Committee, the University Graduate Council, and the Board of Regents.

 

WCoE receives direction from the Texas Legislature, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board(THECB), the Texas Education Agency(TEA), and the State Board of Educator Certification(SBEC).Much of the coordination, planning, delivery, and operation of programs for the preparation of educators is guided and supervised by these governmental bodies.

 

Likewise, the three departments making up WCoE meet regularly to discuss departmental business and plan for the future.Each department receives university funding, and the departments collaboratively decide on the expenditure of funds.Texas law requires that candidates for secondary education certification receive degrees in their content areas. The Unit works closely with the other colleges through the Teacher Education Committee to insure that teacher candidates move smoothly through their program of study and are fully prepared to assume teaching positions after graduation.The Teacher Education Committee is composed of representatives from the West College of Education, the Prothro-Yeager College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the College of Math and Science, and the Lamar D. Fain College of Fine Arts. This committee oversees and considers issues related to teacher education that impact the College of Education.After such issues are addressed by the Teacher Education Committeethe issue is reviewed by the Academic Council level and Provost.In the case of graduate program issues, the decision is vetted through the University Graduate Council before proceeding to Academic Council. 

 

The West College of Education maintains a Professional Development School (PDS) partnership with the Wichita Falls Independent School District (WFISD). More recently, the Burkburnett ISD has provided sites for block classes.Most professional education classes are taught in field based classrooms provided by schools in WFISD and Burkburnett ISD. These partnerships are facilitated by direct communication between College and ISD administration. Also, WCoE faculty members maintain site level dialogues with building principals and public school faculty.University faculty members provide professional development for public school campus personnel when requested (e.g. Two faculty members are working closely with WFISD over a three-year period to implement Response to Intervention on all 29 of the WFISD campuses).

 

Each year, WCoE offers the TAIR Conference(reading) for public educators throughout the area. Professional development credit is available for participation.

 

Through VTEL technology, graduate classes are offered at distant sitesthroughout Regions IX and XI.WCoE classes originate from distance labs at either Ferguson Hall or at Region IX Educational Service Center.Distribution is limited to three distant sites due to hardware limitations.Distance courses are supported through Blackboard. A video conferencing software program Elluminateis being piloted that will provide computer-to-computer class delivery.

Exhibit 5c.1 WCOE Policy Manual

Unit Governance Chart 

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6a.2. What are the Unit's recruiting and admissions policies? How does the Unit ensure that they are clearly and consistently described in publications and catalogues?

 

The West College of Education relies heavily on the Midwestern State University Admissions office for recruitment.MSU is a member of the National Association for College Admission Counseling.The guidelines in the NACAC publication are followed:http://www.nacacnet.org/AboutNACAC/Policies/Documents/SPGP.pdf   

 

The West College of Education’s admissions policies require that all teacher education candidates be above average scholars.To be considered for program admission, the applicant must meet the following criteria:

1. Have an application on file.

2. Have three letters of recommendation on file.

3. Have satisfactory scores on the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA), or equivalent, in reading,

writing, and mathematics;

4. Have at least 60 semester hours of credit.

5. Have a cumulative 2.75 GPA and a 2.5 GPA in freshman English (excluding developmental courses).

 

When the requirements above are met, the student’s application is submitted to the Teacher Education Committee.This committee either accepts or rejects the candidate based on their application, transcript, and other relevant information.If limitations on resources require restricting the number of students accepted, the Teacher Education Committee ranks students according to their level of distinction.

 

Admission to the graduate programs at WCoE requires that the student meet admission requirements for the University, for the Unit, and for the specific program.

 

The Unit ensures that all recruiting and admission guidelines are clearly and consistently described in catalogs and other publications through a process of periodic review. Catalogs are published in two-year cycles, and program coordinators and department heads are involved in revising and editing. Because changes occur between catalog printings, up-to-date catalog information is posted on the university web site.WCoE has designated a faculty member to serve as webmaster in order to submit updates regularly.

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6a.3. How does the Unit ensure that its academic calendars, catalogues, publications, grading policies, and advertising are accurate and current?

 

The West College of Education works closely with the University as a whole to ensure that academic calendars, catalogues, publications, grading policies, and advertising are accurate and current. Unit publication and policy reviews are defined by established deadlines, lines of review, and processes.Academic calendars are developed with Unit input but are finalized at the university level.All calendars appear on the university web siteand are updated regularly. Calendars for the current semester appear in the Description of Courses.

 

Cataloguesare published in two-year cycles with extensive input from the WCoE.Substantive changes are generated at the program level, approved by the College Council, and are then presented the Academic Council and Graduate Council (if related to graduate programs) for consideration and approval.When changes are made between catalog revisions, up-to-date information is posted in the university online catalogs.A recent example of this is that the State of Texas mandated a 120 hour cap on undergraduate degrees, necessitating changes in degree plans and course offerings.The changes were immediately posted on the MSU online catalog website.

 

Grading policies appear in the catalog and also in individual instructor course syllabi. Instructors are expected to update syllabi regularly, keeping grading policies current.Syllabi are submitted to the dean at the beginning of each semester, where they are kept on file in case questions arise.

 

Stakeholders receive updates and information from the Unit via the MSU website. The Unit Webmaster maintains WCoE’s online presence. The University Webmaster oversees the process at the institutional level.

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6a.4. How does the Unit ensure that candidates have access to student services such as advising and counseling?

 

During each registration period, undergraduate students have an advising hold on their records to prevent them from registering without first conferring with their designated advisor.Each faculty member in WCoE carries an advising load and sees the same students each semester.This facilitates a relationship between advisor and student, not only for academic advising but for other needs as well.Advising planning sheetsare available for each certification area to guide the planning process.  

 

Faculty can refer students to the Academic Support Centerfor assistance with class work.College Connections (MWSU 1233) is a 3-hour elective credit course designed to prepare new students for college; Skills for Success (MWSU1003) is a 3-hour elective credit course designed to provide intensive academic assistance; Supplemental Instruction is offered through peer-assisted study sessions in selected, historically difficult academic courses each semester.

 

At the undergraduate level, each semester, a course planning sheet reminds the faculty members to discuss referrals to the Career Management Center or Counseling Center with their advisees.The faculty members check off when this is done. Graduate students access their program coordinator for academic advising.In the case of distance students, this can be accomplished either by phone or email.  

 

Referrals can be made to the Counseling Center.The Counseling Center provides an Academic Recovery Group (focusing on note-taking, study, and test-taking skills) and counseling on relationships, communication skills, conflict resolution, depression and anxiety, anger management, career choices, alcohol and drugs, and self-confidence and self-esteem.

 

Recently, an ad hoc committee made changes to the WCoE Fitness Alert form, which faculty may use as a referral for student services. The procedures require the development of a plan for assistance with documented completion of requirement.

Fitness Alert Forms and Policies 

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6a.5. Which members of the professional community participate in program design, implementation, and evaluation? In what ways do they participate?

 

A system of advisory committees links the West College of Education to the P-12 educational practitioners in the area.The special education, educational leadership, and school counseling programs meet regularly with their advisory committees to discuss program design, delivery, and evaluation.The meetings are agenda-led, and the time is wisely used to not only maximize the input from the participants but also to discuss and refine the ideas presented. The Teacher Education Committee, comprised of faculty members from content areas across campus and public school practitioners, provides input on program design, implementation, and evaluation for initial teacher certification.

 

At the graduate level, practitioners are frequently invited as guest presenters in areas such as school finance, personnel recruiting, and Response to Intervention.Internships (principalship and superintendency) and practicum (school counselors) include on-site mentors and supervisors who are practitioners in the schools.

 

The US Department of Education teacher recruitment grant BEGIN provides resources for teachers in the schools to serve as mentors to aspiring teachers in math, science, and foreign language.A BEGIN advisory committeemade up of members from the area community colleges, educational service center, a partner 4-year college, local public schools, and MSU participate in program design, implementation, and evaluation of the BEGINprogram.

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6a.6. How does the Unit facilitate collaboration with other academic Units involved in the preparation of professional educators?

 

The Teacher Education Committee links the West College of Education with other colleges across campus that assist in preparing teacher candidates.This committee meets four times per year. The Teacher Education Committee includes deans from the College of Math and Science, College of Fine Arts, and College of Humanities. In addition program representatives from math, science, history, foreign language, English, art, music, theatre, along with representatives from local school district serve on the committee.The Teacher Education Committee admits students to the education program, reviews student teaching applications, and admits candidates to student teaching.Members are notified at the beginning of the academic year about all meeting schedules. Agendas are emailed prior to the meeting, and minutes are sent afterwards.

 

Classes for middle school and secondary content areas are taught in the colleges specializing in the various disciplines.Programmatic decisions in the content areas are made collaboratively with the College of Science and Math, the College of Fine Arts, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the College of Education via the Teacher Education Committee.

 

On occasion, faculty members from other colleges with public school experience have served as university supervisors for student teachers who will be teaching in the supervisor’s content area.

Teacher Education Committee Minutes October 12 2009 

Teacher Education Committee Minutes Other 

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6a.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to Unit leadership and authority may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

6b. Unit Budget

 

6b.1. What is the budget available to support programs preparing candidates to meet standards? How does the Unit's budget compare to the budgets of other Units with clinical components on campus or similar Units at other institutions?

 

The resources coming into the West College of Education are displayed in the chartsattached.Chart #1shows the budget available to support programs preparing candidates to meet standards.Data is provided beginning with the 2006-07 budget and ending with the current 2009-2010 budget.The budget is divided into Restricted Funds, Designated Funds, and then the Summary Budget covering faculty salaries and maintenance and operations.The addition of kinesiology personnel to the Department of Counseling and Special Education resulted in an unusually large influx of resources into that department for FY 2009-2010.

 

Restricted Program funds, including grant funding, increased from $74,422 in FY 2006-2007, to $462,453 in FY 2009-2010.This is due in part to the successful grant writing evidenced in the college.

 

Designated Funds (funds allocated for specific needs) increased from $112,382 in FY 2006-07 to $136,306 in FY 2009-2010.Again, this increase is primarily due to the inclusion of kinesiology personnel into the Department of Counseling and Special Education.

 

Chart #2shows how the West College of Education’s budget compares to other colleges with clinical components at Midwestern State University; the Dillard College of Business and the College of Health Sciences and Human Services.Chart #2 portrays the annual budgets for FY 2007-08 and the semester credit hours produced by each of the professional colleges.The same is shown for FY 2009-09.Further analysis could undoubtedly reveal more detail, but it is obvious that the budget for the West College of Education is approximately 2/3 the size of the budget for the Dillard College of Business, yet the number of SCH produced by the West College of Education is approximately half that produced by the Dillard College of Business. The WCoE budget is approximately one third the size of the College of Health Sciences and Human Services, and the number of SCH produced by the WCoE is approximately 25% of the number of SCH produced by the College of Health Science and Human Services. Economies of scale undoubtedly come into play here.The data show that the West College of Education is funded equitably with the funding of the other professional colleges.

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6b.2. How adequately does the budget support all programs for the preparation of educators? What changes to the budget over the past few years have affected the quality of the programs offered?

The West Foundation generously provides professional development and travel funds for WCoE faculty.For the FY 2009-2010, $20,000 was devoted to this purpose. The university provided an additional $5850.

 

The WCoE faculty members augment Institutional funding by grant writing.The Unit received $1,652,974 in grant funding in FY 2008-09 and $1,589,747 in FY 2009-2010.

 

The Educational Technology faculty members provide technology training on an as-needed basis.On occasion, classes have been held in on-line teaching, creating web pages, and using specific software packages.One of the educational technology faculty members was awarded a sabbatical last year during which time she researched on-line learning and assisted other faculty members in developing on line courses.

 

Over the past several years, changes were made that increased the budget and provided additional resources to serve students.In 2001-02, the college was organized into three departments, resulting in a larger total budget for the college.Additionally, the faculty has grown from 13 to 25 members in the past ten years.Both these increases in resources have improved the quality of the programs offered.

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6b.3. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the Unit's budget may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

6c. Personnel

 

6c.1. What are the institution's and Unit's workload policies? What is included in the workloads of faculty (e.g., hours of teaching, advising of candidates, supervising student teachers, work in P-12 schools, independent study, research, administrative duties, and dissertation advisement)?

 

WCoE adheres to the policy and procedures outlined in the Policy Manual. A full load is 12 undergraduate hours, but this is generally limited to 9 hours in WCoE because most faculty members either teach in a PDS or teach graduate courses, both of which garner a 3 hour load reduction.

 

WCoE faculty workload is comprised of teaching and other duties. All full-time faculty members are required to keep a minimum of 10 hours of week for office hours. The advising of candidates is distributed throughout the college and occurs several times throughout the year coinciding with registration periods. In addition to advising duties, the faculty workload includes serving on university committees (e.g., core-curriculum committee, readmission committee, faculty senate) and various ad hoc Unit committees (e.g., search committees, standard committees).

 

Most candidates in student teaching are supervised by adjunct professors who are former principals, special education directors, and retired master teachers. When the need arises, a full time faculty member may supervise student teachers. The supervision of 6 candidates in student teaching counts as 3 hours toward the teaching load.

 

All full-time faculty members are expected to help mentor candidates to help them develop. Each semester candidates in student teaching are evenly distributed among the faculty in order to provide additional guidance and assistance with their capstone student teaching project, the Teacher Work Sample. Faculty members help candidates clarify and organize their reports, develop assessment methods, and provide feedback on lesson planning and instructional designs. Faculty members are then responsible for critiquing the students’ Teacher Work samples and providing additional feedback.

 

The Unit encourages a wide range of professional activities such as research, grant writing, and independent study and is very supportive in these endeavors. Financial support for professional development is offered through the University Research Committee (under the supervision of the Office of Graduate Studies) and the WCoE Research Committee. In addition, approved leave is granted in order to present research at conferences and collaborate with other scholars. 

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6c.2. What are the faculty workloads for teaching and the supervision of clinical practice?

 

Faculty work assignments are made according to formal educational preparation, work experience, and/or demonstrated skills. Instructional assignments are determined by the department chair, but are subject to the approval of the Unit’s dean and the university provost. WCoE strives to adhere to the policy and procedures outlined in the Policy Manual. A full load is 12 undergraduate hours, but this is generally limited to 9 hours in WCoE because most faculty members either teach in a PDS or teach graduate courses, both of which garner a 3 hour load reduction. Load reductions are also given to department chairs, special assistants to the dean, and other faculty members while they perform special administrative duties for the Unit. Faculty members who teach courses in the various professional development schools generally spend half of their time supervising teacher candidates as they learn new skills. In addition, some of the specialty programs (bi-lingual and special education) have additional clinical experiences which require these faculty members to supervise candidates in the field.

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6c.3. To what extent do workloads and class size allow faculty to be engaged effectively in teaching, scholarship, and service (including time for such responsibilities as advisement, developing assessments, and online courses)?

 

As faculty members of a small, active institution, Unit professors and instructors have full workloads. The Unit has prided itself on providing personalized attention and innovative instruction. Class size generally ranges from 18-25 in core education courses and between 5-15 in graduate programs. WCoE faculty members model effective instruction in class and plan activities that allow for small group collaboration. WCoE is proud of the faculty’s dedication to fostering a personalized education by active involvement in study groups, student organizations, and mentoring. Often these instructional and teaching activities are interwoven with service learning. For example, special education majors engage in service projects assisting such organizations as The Arc. Other student organizations under the leadership of faculty are engaged in book drives and tutoring students from disadvantaged backgrounds.A review of their vitaeand course evaluationsshows excellent teaching, extensive service, and meaningful scholarship appropriate to their field. 

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6c.4. How does the Unit ensure that the use of part-time faculty contributes to the integrity,

coherence, and quality of the Unit and its programs?

 

The majority of education courses are taught by full-time professional education faculty. Part-time colleagues are selected carefully with the intent of adding special expertise and skills to the program. Part-time faculty members are sometimes used to fill a variety of positions within the Unit including ones in the Special Education, Counseling, and Curriculum & Instruction departments. The majority of student teaching supervisors are part-time, contracted employees. The faculty members selected for these positions have extensive experience in the public schools and respective disciplines. These faculty members include former principals, master teachers, and special education directors. Each student teacher supervisor goes through a thorough training and is given a workload that allows for close supervision and mentoring.Another example of using part time faculty in a manner that contributes to the quality of the Unit is the selection of faculty that help strengthen the connection with the Unit to the community at large. Part-time faculty members have a vested interest in the success of the overall mission of the Unit and bring with them important connections to the schools, current subject-matter expectations and standards, and great skill in pedagogical content knowledge. In addition, many are in leadership positions in their respective fields, often providing candidates greater access to jobs after graduation.  

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6c.5. What personnel provide support for the Unit? How does the Unit ensure that it has an

adequate number of support personnel?

 

Support for the Unit is provided by a secretary and 3 assistants to the dean. Each of the dean’s assistants have additional responsibilities such as supporting the certification officer and assisting with grants and scholarships. The Unit also employs seven graduate assistants that support the dean’s assistants and faculty. The Unit ensures that it has an adequate number of support personnel through traditional means such as departmental budgets and requesting additional personnel from administration. In addition, state and federal grants have allowed the Unit to hire additional support personnel and supplement the salaries of certain endowed professors. Support personnel are allocated through the faculty and chair requests. Requests are made based upon demonstrated need.

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6c.6. What financial support is available for professional development activities for faculty? 

 

WCoE faculty is provided financial support for professional development through a variety of sources. Faculty development funds are sometimes obtained through the generous contribution of private donors, and are used to fund such things as out-of-state conferences, technology, and membership in professional organizations. Monies are also obtained via the regular budgetary process from the Institution. The Institution supports professional development through faculty research grants and sabbatical leaves. Some faculty members also receive funds by assuming leadership positions in professional organizations. Each department receives travel funds, and the President's office disperses professional development monies from his President's Excellence Committee. MSU and WCoE have traditionally received support from Alumni who give to the West College of Education during the Annual Fund drive. These monies are used for professional development. The president's office has also candidate travel to professional conferences. WCoE faculty members have obtained several state and federal grants in recent years containing travel funds that support scholarship related to the grant's goals and objectives. Allocation for the 2010-2011 academic year are:

West Foundation-$22,750

President Excellence - $5514

Annual Fund - $7500

Exhibit 5f West Foundation Summary

Faculty Development Leave Policy

http://personnel.mwsu.edu/policy/3.1-faculty-policies/3.136-Faculty_Development_Leave.asp 

Faculty Research

http://personnel.mwsu.edu/policy/3.1-faculty-policies/3.142-Faculty_Research.asp 

 

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6c.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to personnel may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

6d. Unit facilities

 

6d.1. How adequate are Unit--classrooms, faculty offices, library/media center, the technology infrastructure, and school facilities--to support teaching and learning? [Describe facilities on the main campus as well as the facilities at off-campus sites if they exist.]

 

WCoE is a Professional Development School (PDS) based program. Most professional education coursework is delivered in field based classrooms provided by area public school partners, Wichita Falls Independent School District(WFISD) and Burkburnett Independent School District(BISD). This partnership includes Wichita Falls High Schooland Hirschi High School, and four elementary schools (Alamo, Cunningham, Crockett(WFISD), and Evans(BISD). This arrangement provides WCoE teacher candidates access to in-service teachers and their students in authentic contexts and facilitates extensive opportunity for observation and experiential learning. Additionally, this public school partnership provides WCoE broad access to student teaching and internship opportunities.

 

WCoE administrative and faculty offices are located on the MSU campusin the Ferguson Hall, and the remainder of the professional education coursework is delivered either in this building or elsewhere on the MSU campus. The Ferguson Building is equipped with a full featured, 25 station computer lab and a distance education classroom that provides access to off campus students via ITV. A staff member from IT works in the computer lab and in the distance learning lab for administrative support.

 

The MSU library has a contact representative for the unit who works directly with requests from the faculty. In addition, the unit has a faculty member who serves on the library resources committee. This member on a regular basis collects feedback from faculty about updates to book and journal resources. In addition, the dean can make special requests for items during the middle of an academic year.

Institutional Systems (IT)and Distance Learning maintain a support system to assist faculty and candidates with technology and learninghttp://distance.mwsu.edu/distance/index.aspissues. The staff in IT responds quickly to issues that arise and provide advice in acquisitions of new technology.

 

WCOE is investing in new technologies to expand learning capabilities. The unit, as part of external funding, is acquiring two ‘SMART” boards for use in instructional technology. In addition, the unit is investing in hybrid learning technology to provide digital access to more candidates in rural areas. The ability to investigate this technology is supported by the efforts of the staff in IT. 

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6d.2. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to Unit facilities may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

6e. Unit resources including technology

 

6e.1. How does the Unit allocate resources across programs to ensure candidates meet standards in their field of study?

 

All facilities are shared by the various programs supported by WCoE. Each PDS classroom, each student, and each professor is provided with the same level of support and access to technology as any other, regardless of their program. In the case of special needs, such as the school counseling program, facilities and technology such as one way mirrors and audio video recording equipment is primarily for the use of that program, but it can and often is used by other programs such as reading diagnostics and speech therapy. Collegial cooperation is not a goal or a vision in WCOE, it is a daily reality. The unit provides a department budget for resource allocation to professional education courses. Each department in the other colleges also has a dedicated budget that provides resources to instructors.

These budgets are prepared for a following fiscal year during the spring semester. These budgets are sent forward to the Provost who meets with the deans and determines priorities. In the summer, deans are notified of their allocations.

The department budgets include maintenance and operations as well as travel funds. The travel funds from the Institution are combined with professional development money from the West Foundation and distributed to faculty. For the last couple of years, at the request of tenured faculty, non-tenured faculty have been allocated a larger portion of travel to encourage research and presentations. In addition, faculty may apply for university research grants for individual or collegial activities.  

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6e.2. What information technology resources support faculty and candidates? What evidence shows that candidates and faculty use these resources?

 

Each PDS classroom is equipped with a 20 station laptop computer cart, wireless Internet access, an LCD projector, and a digital document camera. Each WCoE classroom is equipped with a computer for the instructor, wireless Internet access, an LCD projector, a digital document camera, and an array of video playback devices.

 

WCoE makes extensive use of its dedicated computer lab and ITV classroom. The 25 station WCoE computer lab is equipped with up-to-date computers and software in support of teacher preparation coursework. When not in use as a teaching venue for technology courses, the lab is available to WCOE candidates and is staffed with a student technology aid during hours when the building is in use. WCOE offers a teaching specific computer applications course (EDUC 1023) that is required of all candidates. WCOE uses Blackboardonline course management systems to deliver coursework to candidates in all graduate and undergraduate programs. Most WCoE undergraduate and graduate courses use Blackboard to provide online access to supplementary coursework and materials, and many graduate education courses are delivered exclusively online via Blackboard or by ITV. Candidates regularly submit assignments using Blackboard and professors provide feedback in the same manner. Also, WCoE maintains a database of online resourcesof interest and use to in-service educators and teacher education students.

 

All MSU students and faculty are provided with personal email accounts and Internet access allowing convenient and secure personal communication between candidates and WCoE faculty members and to distance education facilities such as Blackboard and .All field (PDS) based classrooms are equipped with portable networked laptop computer carts used both by WCOE candidates and faculty and PDS in-service teachers and their students. Candidates are required to integrate technology purposefully and professionally into all lessons prepared for their field experience whenever the technology offers a pedagogical advantage. Such experiences include common assessment such as the thematic Unit (reading block) and the mini teacher work sample (planning and assessment block). Candidates in student teaching are expected to describe ways they integrate technology into their instruction in both their lesson plans and in the Teacher Work Sample.  

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6e.3. What resources are available for the development and implementation of the Unit's assessment system?

 

WCOE uses TK20database systems to collect and store candidate and program data and to facilitate ongoing measures of Unit effectiveness. Data stored on the TK20 system includes candidate demographic and assessment data and program tracking data. Every candidate and faculty member has access to TK20 via secure login. Candidates submit certain (common assessment) instruments directly to the TK20 database. WCOE faculty members then use the system to score student work and return feedback to candidates.  

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6e.4. What library and curricular resources exist at the institution? How does the Unit ensure they are sufficient and current?

 

The MSU Moffett Librarysupports the WCoE by providing extensive access to texts and other materials supporting the teaching profession. Additionally, the Moffett Library provides WCoE students and faculty online access to a broad database of professional education periodicals. The MSU Moffett Library also supports the WCoE directly by providing a dedicated Curriculum Materials Library(CML) and librarian. The CML provides WCoE faculty and students access to a wide range of professional literature, children’s literature, and other texts and materials commonly used in public school classrooms.

 

Moffett Library provides WCoE a budget of several thousand dollars each year to purchase new instructional media in support of the undergraduate teacher preparation program, advanced programs in education, and research. This money is used to purchase new books, videos, and professional databases in supportof coursework.

 

WCoE periodically reviews the materials available in the library and recommends retention or replacement of materials and media related to teacher preparation curriculum, public school curriculum, and pedagogy.  

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6e.5. How does the Unit ensure the accessibility of resources to candidates, including candidates in off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, through electronic means?

 

WCoE offers course work online and ITV and regularly serves students throughout North Texas and often from places around the world. In addition to using the Blackboard classroom management system to deliver instruction, content, and virtual discourse, WCoE also takes advantage of certain other information systems such as blogs, video databases, and Internet based client to client video conferencing/chat.

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6e.6. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to Unit resources, including technology, may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

 

Optional

 

1. What does your Unit do particularly well related to Standard 6?

 

 

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2. What research related to Standard 6 is being conducted by the Unit or its faculty?

 

 

2,000 characters

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